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date: 17 February 2020

Lincoln, Abraham locked

(b. 12 February 1809; d. 15 April 1865), sixteenth president of the United States.
  • Paul Finkelman
  •  and Vickey Kalambakal

Extract

Abraham Lincoln, self-made and self-educated, remains one of America's best-loved presidents. He rose from obscurity and poverty through his own efforts to become president. His election in 1860 as the first president dedicated to ending the spread of slavery to new states led to the secession of seven slave states. His refusal to allow the Union to fall apart led to civil war and to the secession of four more states. During the war Lincoln presided over a revolution in American race relations that ended slavery; allowed for black political and military participation in the affairs of the nation; and, after his assassination, resulted in blacks' gaining full rights as American citizens.

A version of this article originally appeared in The Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895.

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