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Eduardo Silva

also known as Dom Obá II D’África, honorary sublieutenant of the Brazilian army and abolitionist, was born in Vila de Lençóis, in the backlands of the province of Bahia, Brazil. His father (?–1877) was born in Yoruba-speaking West Africa and as a child was sold as a slave in Salvador da Bahia where he was baptized and given the name Benvindo. As a slave he had no right to a surname, but when he was later manumitted he adopted the surname of his former master (Da Fonseca Galvão), probably because it held great social prestige. Benvindo became a lifelong Catholic and learned to speak, read, and write Portuguese. After being manumitted, he married Maria de São José (?–1869), also a formerly enslaved African. In 1845 the couple joined the diamond rush to Lençóis where they had two children Cândido da Fonseca Galvão and Francisca Gil ...

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Ian Jones

African‐American scientist and inventor who worked in Britain. Lewis Latimer's parents were Rebecca and George Latimer, fugitive slaves from Virginia who gained their liberty in the free state of Massachusetts, where Lewis was born. Lewis served in the American Civil War (1861–5), after which he worked as an office boy in a patent law firm. His employers soon recognized his talent for drawing and made him head draughtsman. He married Mary Wilson (1848–1937) in 1873 and wrote a poem for his wedding, which he later published in his collection Poems of Love and Life.

When he was 25, Lewis invented an improved toilet for railway carriages, and in 1876Alexander Graham Bell hired him to produce the drawings he needed to patent the telephone. Lewis was later headhunted by the US Electric Lighting Company, and in 1882 was awarded a patent for a ...

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Mariana Isabel Lorenzetti

was born in the 1860s, to parents whose names were not recorded. The exact dates and places of his birth and death are unknown. Marcos de Estrada (1979) writes that he was born in Buenos Aires on 25 March 1865 and died in 1935 in the same city. However, Pablo Norberto Cirio (2010) indicates 1868 as his birthdate, pointing to a misunderstanding of the date and place of his death, according to the Afro-Argentine records of the Comisión Permanente de Estudios Afroargentinos (Permanent Commission of Argentine Studies). Magee was able to finish his education thanks to his parents’ savings and later began preparing for his apprenticeship as a railroad engineer. During his youth, he worked as a machinist in the railway system until 1890 He then submitted an application to the Ministry of War under the direction of General Lavalle during the presidency of Juárez ...