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Barnes, Steven  

Sandra Y. Govan

A Los Angeles native and later resident of Vancouver, Washington, Steven Emory Barnes is the third African American author after 1960 to have chosen science fiction and fantasy writing as his primary profession. Barnes established himself through the 1980s as a determined and disciplined writer, one who had followed a cherished childhood dream to become a commercially successful professional writer.

The youngest child of Emory F. Barnes and Eva Mae (Reeves) Barnes, Steven Barnes grew up in Los Angeles. He attended Los Angeles High, Los Angeles City College, and Pepperdine University, Malibu, California (1978–1980 At Pepperdine he majored in communication arts but withdrew from school before completing a degree frustrated because he thought no one on the faculty could teach him about building a career as a professional writer It was not until Barnes made contact with established science fiction writer Ray Bradbury who sent the novice ...

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Shine, Ted  

Steven R. Carter

and contributor to the Black Arts movement and regional theater. Soon after Ted (Theodis) Shine's birth in Baton Rouge, he and his parents, Theodis and Bessie, moved to Dallas where he grew up. At Howard University he was encouraged to pursue satiric playwriting by Owen Dodson, who tactfully indicated Shine's limits as a tragic writer. His play Sho Is Hot in the Cotton Patch was produced at Howard in 1951. Graduating in 1953, Shine studied at the Karamu Theatre in Cleveland on a Rockefeller grant through 1955 and then served two years in the army. Earning his MA at the University of lowa in 1958, he began his career as a teacher of drama at Dillard University in 1960, moving to Howard University from 1961to 1967 and then settling at Prairie View A M University where he became a professor and head ...

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Shine, Ted  

Edward T. Washington

was born Theodis Wesley Shine, Jr. in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, the son of Theodis Wesley Shine, Sr. and Bessie Herson Shine. Before Shine’s third birthday, the family moved to Dallas, Texas. Shine credits elementary school teacher Lorna Dunlap and high school teacher Willie Burke Anderson with fueling his early passion for writing. By the time he graduated from Dallas’s Booker T. Washington High School in 1949, Shine had already written several plays.

Shine attended Howard University in Washington, DC from 1949 to 1953. There he honed his playwriting abilities under the tutelage of esteemed dramatist and educator Owen Dodson. It was Dodson who fostered Shine’s acumen in comedic and satirical writing. Sho Is Hot in the Cotton Patch, one of Shine’s earliest plays, achieved critical acclaim with its production at Howard in 1951.

From 1953 to 1955 Shine was the recipient of a Rockefeller Grant ...