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Charles Rosenberg

also known as Tallen and John Bull, was enslaved in Africa, shipped to America, freed by the interception of a British vessel, made prisoner of war while serving in the British navy, then tricked into slavery in Savannah, Georgia; he earned and purchased his freedom three times over, being defrauded the first two times.

From accounts he gave later in life, it is believed he was born among the Kissi, a people ethnologically related to the Malinke, in what is now Guinea, on a tributary of the Niandan River. His given name was Tallen. Captured in a local war at age 12, and brought to the coast for sale as a slave, he was being transported across the Atlantic when the ship carrying him was intercepted by a British vessel, probably in 1811. The exact circumstances remain a matter of controversy. By his own account, recorded in 1857 ...

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In the late sixteenth century a group of English traders consolidated their business under the African Company receiving formal recognition from the British crown in 1618 Several other iterations of the company would be formed over the ensuing decades and would remain in business as late as 1821 As the name suggests the bulk of the company s profits came from the shipping of slaves from Africa to the Americas and the newly established city of Baltimore became one of the most profitable ports of call When the Board of Trade an oversight committee established under Parliament inquired in 1708 as to the number of slaves brought to Maryland Governor John Seymour r 1704 1709 responded in the letter reproduced below By then as the letter indicates the trafficking of slaves had been farmed out to separate traders who had successfully protested the company s monopoly over the slavery business ...

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Delores Williams

college professor, political philosopher, and civil rights advocate, was born Preston Theodore King in Albany, Georgia, the youngest of seven sons of Clennon W. King, a civil rights advocate and businessman, and Margaret Slater.

King followed the family view that education was essential and mandatory and proved himself to be a brilliant scholar at an early age. He entered Fisk University in Nashville at age sixteen. He majored in history, languages, and philosophy and graduated magna cum laude with a B.A. He enrolled in graduate school at the London School of Economics & Political Science in England, where he earned an M.Sc. (Econ.), the Leverhulme Award in 1958, and the Mark of Distinction and a Ph.D. in 1966. He also studied during the summers at Atlanta University (1955), Universität Wien in Austria, 1956, 1958 German language Université de Strasbourg ...

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Charles Rosenberg

also spelled Pearce or Pierce, was an early settler in Plimoth Plantations (Plymouth Colony) in what is now the state of Massachusetts, who, according to a good deal of research from contemporary documents, was probably African or of African descent. Some commentators vigorously insist that this is unlikely.

Whatever his national origin, complexion, or standing in the Plymouth community, most sources agree that an Abraham Pearse settled in the colony of New Plymouth around 1623, most likely arriving on the Anne, from England, as one of two servants of another “Mr. Perce,” both of whom were granted land that year. Plymouth scholar Robert Marten concluded that Pearse had most likely gone to England after working as an indentured servant in the British colony of Barbados at that time devoted to growing tobacco with indentured labor although most plantations later converted to sugar production using slave labor sold ...

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The empires of Britain and Spain frequently used African slaves as combatants in their increasingly hostile conflict along the southeastern colonies of the Americas In 1693 tensions escalated when the Spanish offered to emancipate any slaves who escaped from Carolina into Florida Over the years hundreds of fugitive slaves made the journey despite the fact that many blacks within the Spanish territories remained in bondage In 1728 the British attacked the city of St Augustine and runaway slaves played a major role in defending the outpost After this show of loyalty the Crown issued another decree of emancipation this time for all slaves who arrived in Florida In response the freed people established the nearby fort of Gracia Real de Santa Teresa de Mose which also housed a community of several dozen families In the pledge below the fort s militiamen promise the Spanish officials that they will continue to ...

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“The blood of men, women and babes cries unto God from Texas to Maine. Wherever the Fugitive Slave Law reaches, the voice of its victims is heard.”

So begins this passionate excoriation of the “peculiar institution” of human chattel slavery. The reader is thrust into the middle of a slave auction, wherein a family is split apart by the auctioneer, and the assembled buyers evince a keenly perverse interest in the Christian devotion of the “articles” arrayed before them. As with many such slave narratives, Sketches of Slave Life: or Illustrations of the “Peculiar Institution” is part condemnation part call to action Published by its author in Boston in 1855 the work stands as an unusually vivid and floridly felt example of the genre Peter a former slave seems far more interested in describing the horror and cruelty of slavery than in relating his own story Rather than a ...

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Charles Rosenberg

convened the first Pan-African Conference in July 1900 in London, England, in the midst of a legal career that included admission to the bar in England, South Africa (Cape Colony), and Trinidad and election as probably the first African-descended borough councillor in Britain.

Williams was born on Arouca, Trinidad, the son of Henry Bishop Williams, a wheelwright, and Elizabeth Williams, immigrants from Barbados. Barbados was strongly influenced by British culture, while Trinidad had a majority French–Creole African population, with Indian indentured laborers imported starting in 1845. Williams attended a village government school, closely associated to the Church of England, to which he belonged his entire life.

At age fifteen, he passed an examination for admission to the Men's Normal School in Port-of-Spain, and in 1886 he passed a teaching exam (Mathurin, p. 21). His first teaching assignment, in 1887 was La Fortunee Bien Venue Government School ...