1-20 of 28 Results  for:

  • Performing Arts x
  • Arts and Leisure x
  • Education and Academia x
  • 1955–1971: Civil Rights Era x
  • Performing Arts x
Clear all

Article

Philip Herbert

Nigeriancomposer, organist, and ethnomusicologist born in Uyo, Akwa Ibom state, Nigeria, in 1932. In his early education at King's College, Lagos, and as a chorister at Christchurch Cathedral, in that city, he was exposed to European classical music, Mendelssohn being his favourite composer. His musical outlook was eclectic, and he was involved in dance bands such as the Chocolate Dandies and the Akpabot Players (his own band), formed in 1949, as well as being organist at St Saviour's Anglican Church in Lagos.

Akpabot studied the trumpet and organ in London at the Royal College of Music in 1954, with teachers such as John Addison, Osborn Pisgow, and Herbert Howells. Study at the University of Chicago yielded a Master's degree in Musicology, and he also received a Ph.D. from Michigan State University. He was a broadcaster for the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation (1959 ...

Article

Philip Herbert

Composer, contralto, successful vocal coach, accompanist, and teacher. She was the youngest daughter of the famous African‐American actor Ira Aldridge, and born in Upper Norwood, London. Early on she was educated at a convent school in Belgium. At the age of 17 she was awarded a scholarship to study singing at the Royal College of Music. Her teachers included Jenny Lind and George Henschel for singing, along with Frederick Bridge and Frances Edward Gladstone for harmony and counterpoint.

Aldridge's career was successful and varied, as a contralto until an attack of laryngitis damaged her voice, an accompanist, vocal coach, and later a composer. She accompanied her brother Ira Frederick Aldridge on musical tours until his death in 1886. She also accompanied her sister Luranah in concerts at many well‐known London venues at the turn of the 20th century.

Aldridge also played a seminal ...

Article

Cynthia Tse Kimberlin

Ethiopian ethnomusicologist, composer, scholar, and teacher, was born in Addis Ababa. His paternal grandfather was Liqe Mekuwas Adinew Goshu, a renowned hero of the Battle of Adwa and a close confidant of Empress Taitu. His great grandfather, Dejazmach Goshu, served as a mentor and teacher to Emperor Tewodros. The most creative and artistic individual in his family was his mother, Fantaye Nekere, who composed verse and poetry. She taught Ashenafi about Ethiopian artistic forms, which he later drew upon for his work.

Ashenafi first showed an interest in music while attending Haile Selassie I Elementary School. After attending the Harar Teachers’ Training School, he taught music at Haile Sellassie I University and the Addis Ababa YMCA before obtaining his BA in Music (1962 from the University of Rochester s Eastman School of Music in the United States He returned to Addis Ababa to serve as the first official ...

Article

Philip Herbert

Nigeriancomposer and ethnomusicologist born in Lagos. His early musical education included being a chorister at Christchurch, Lagos, and in 1945 he enrolled in the Baptist Academy in that city. In 1954 he met Fela Sowande at the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation, who gave him organ tuition. He found Sowande's nationalistic compositional style inspirational.

From 1957 onwards Bankole composed and studied music in England under a government scholarship. From the Guildhall School of Music and Drama he gained a graduate teaching diploma for studies in piano, organ, and composition. His brilliance at the organ was rewarded with a scholarship to Clare College, Cambridge, and he gained a Bachelor's degree in music in 1964 a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists in the same year and later a Master s degree Through reading ethnomusicology at the University of California his interest in the use of traditional African instruments and improvised ...

Article

Kip Lornell

Campbell, Lucie E. (1885–03 January 1963), gospel composer and teacher, was born in Duck Hill, Mississippi, the daughter of Burrell Campbell, a railroad worker, and Isabella Wilkerson. Her mother was widowed several months after Lucie’s birth, and the family soon moved from Carroll County to Memphis, the nearest major city. Lucie and her many siblings struggled to survive on their mother’s meager wages, which she earned by washing and ironing clothing. Given the family’s insubstantial income, it could afford a musical education for only one child: Lucie’s older sister Lora. Lucie eventually learned to play piano, however, through her own persistence, a gifted ear for music, and a little help from Lora.

Lucie Campbell was a bright student who easily mastered elementary school and middle school winning awards in both penmanship and Latin Even before graduating from Kortrecht Senior High School later Booker T Washington as the ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

located just outside the large city of Manchester in Great Britain. His mother, Muriel (née Braudo), belonged to a prosperous Jewish family from Gwelo, Zimbabwe, and worked as a cabaret singer. His father, Denis, was from England originally, but the couple wed in Johannesburg, South Africa. Six months after Clegg’s birth, his parents divorced. Muriel took Clegg briefly to Israel before returning to her parents’ family farm in Zimbabwe.

Though his mother showed relatively little interest in African culture, Clegg as a boy became friendly with the Ndebele son of a chauffeur who worked for the Braudo farm. While his mother toured clubs with bands, Clegg was left in a strict boarding school. In 1960, Clegg moved to South Africa with his mother and his stepfather, reporter Dan Pienaar. The family moved to Zambia in 1965 after Pienaar obtained a position as a journalist for a newspaper there ...

Article

Roanne Edwards

During the 1960s Roque Cordero gained international recognition as an innovative composer of contemporary classical music. He has received numerous awards for his compositions, including the Koussevitzky International Recording Award in 1974 for his Violin Concerto (1962). Although he employs modern compositional techniques, he strongly identifies with his Panamanian heritage and has sought to create music with both Afro-indigenous character and universal appeal.

Cordero was born and raised in Panama City, Panama. As a teenager, he revealed a talent for musical composition and won several local prizes. In 1939 he wrote his first notable work for orchestra, the Capricho Interiorano. Impressed by the bold experimentalism of the Viennese composer Arnold Schoenberg, he aspired to a Western musical education and in 1943 enrolled on a scholarship at the University of Minnesota in the United States. After extensive musical study with composer Ernst Krenek and conductor Dimitri ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

musician and intellectual, was born in the town of Impfondo in the Republic of Congo (Congo-Brazzaville) on 18 August 1914. He excelled in his primary and secondary studies, and was in the first class of students to enroll at the Poto-Poto neighborhood school in 1925. His intelligence was evident by the fact that he became an assistant teacher in 1929 at the age of fifteen In his youth Dadet was one of the best football players in Brazzaville during the 1930s and 1940s and helped to form the Native Sports Federation which organized competition between African soccer teams in Brazzaville Besides being a player himself Dadet also took the role as a referee in games Upon graduation from secondary school Dadet became a teacher at the respected École Urbaine of Brazzaville Besides teaching and playing sports Dadet also cultivated another passion music Dadet became a renowned ...

Article

James Ross Moore

Duncan, Todd (12 February 1903–27 February 1998), singer and teacher, was born Robert Todd Duncan in Danville, Kentucky, the son of John Duncan, a garage owner, and Lettie Cooper Duncan, a music teacher. Duncan's B.A. (1925) came from Butler University; his M.A. (1930) from Columbia University's Teachers College.

Duncan taught music at the University of Louisville's Municipal College for Negroes from 1926 to 1929. While working on his master's degree, he studied voice with Sara Lee, Edward Lippo, and Sidney Dietch. In 1931 Duncan took a position at Howard University in Washington, D.C., where before retiring in 1945 he became head of the public school music and professional voice departments.

Duncan's singing career blossomed after a one-night, all–African-American production of Cavalleria Rusticana at New York s Mecca Temple in 1934 the year he married Gladys Jackson They had one child and remained married until Duncan s ...

Article

Charles Rosenberg

musician and inspirational band teacher, whose graduates included some of the top musicians in twentieth-century North America, was born in St. Joseph Missouri, the eldest child of Rev. William Walter S. Dyett, and Minerva Peck Dyett. His father was born in Montserrat in the British West Indies, and was brought to the United States as a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church by assignment of Bishop Benjamin Tucker Tanner in 1888. His mother was born in Alabama, marrying Rev. Dyett in 1899. One sister, Anne L. Dyett, was born in 1903.

Transferred often under the itinerant ministry tradition of the AME church, Rev. Dyett lived at various times on the British colony of Bermuda, Connecticut (where he was pastor of New Haven's Bethel AME Church in 1893 Pennsylvania Colorado Missouri and Nebraska When he was appointed pastor of First AME Church in ...

Article

Glenn Allen Knoblock

World War II veteran, Bronze Star recipient, musician, and educator was born in Anderson, South Carolina, the eldest child of Reverend Charles Francis and his wife Hermena. In 1934 the Francis family moved to Keysville, Georgia, where his father accepted an assignment to lead Boggs Academy, a Presbyterian college preparatory school for African Americans founded in 1906. Charles Francis Jr. graduated from Boggs Academy in 1936 and subsequently attended Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina, earning a degree in history in 1941.

Following his graduation, Francis briefly worked as a traveling salesman and also may have worked as a railroad porter, but with America's entry into World War II in 1942, Francis enlisted as a soldier in the US Army. His early military career is unknown, but by early 1943 Francis was assigned to the divisional staff of the all ...

Article

Raoul F. Camus

(b Columbia, SC, June 21, 1914). American bandmaster, arranger and educator. He attended West Virginia State College (BMus 1948) and Marshall State University (MA 1954 After playing the trumpet in Air Force and dance bands he was appointed director of bands at Tennessee ...

Article

Marva O. Banks

Born in Newark, New Jersey, on 7 November 1936, to Nathan E. and Gladys Fruitt Heard (a blues singer), Nathan Cliff Heard was reared by his mother and maternal grandmother in Newark's inner city; he dropped out of school at fifteen, drifted into a life of crime, and spent the next seventeen years (1951–1968) in and out of New Jersey State Prison at Trenton where he served time for armed robbery.

While in prison Heard distinguished himself as a talented and award-winning athlete. It was not until fellow prisoner Harold Carrington introduced him to the masters—Langston Hughes, Samuel Beckett, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Amiri Baraka, and others—that Heard began to write, at first about music and African history. In 1963, encouraged by his fellow inmates, he wrote the manuscript for To Reach a Dream Although the novel did not sell ...

Article

Roanne Edwards

Following her recital debut at New York City's Town Hall in 1954, Natalie Hinderas established herself as a pianist of exceptional talent. Her playing has been described as both lyrical and technically brilliant and, on occasion, “super-bravura.” She performed as a soloist with America's top orchestras and toured widely in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the West Indies. Known as a champion of piano music by black composers, she actively campaigned to expand opportunities for black artists at a time when most American conductors and music managers were reluctant to hire them.

Hinderas was reared and educated in Oberlin, Ohio. Her father was a professional Jazz musician and her mother was a gifted pianist and conservatory music teacher A child prodigy Hinderas began playing piano at the age of three and later studied voice and violin When she was eight years old she was admitted to the Oberlin ...

Article

Roanne Edwards

A woman of many talents, Eva Jessye pursued a music career that spanned more than half a century and won her a reputation as “the dean of black female musicians.” During the 1930s she gained international attention as director of the Eva Jessye Choir, which toured the United States and Europe, and sang in the first production of George Gershwin's folk opera Porgy and Bess (1935). During the next three decades, she led the choir in numerous revivals of the opera and in 1963 directed the choir for the historic March on Washington led by Martin Luther King

Jessye grew up in Coffeyville, Kansas, where, after the separation of her parents in 1898, her grandmother and her mother's sisters reared her. As a child she began singing, organized a girls' quartet, and, at the age of twelve, helped composer Will Marion Cook copy music for ...

Article

Barry Kernfeld

(b New Orleans, Oct 18, 1961). American trumpeter, composer, bandleader and educationist, brother of Branford Marsalis. From an early age he studied both jazz and classical music. When he was 14 he performed Haydn’s Trumpet Concerto with the New Orleans PO and while a student at the Juilliard School he joined Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers (1980). He toured in a quartet with Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and Tony Williams and recorded his first album as leader (1981), then in early 1982 left Blakey to form a quintet (1982–5) with his brother Branford; he also toured with Hancock in 1983 as a member of the quintet V.S.O.P. II. In 1984 he became the first musician to win Grammy awards for both a jazz recording and a classical recording. Marsalis completed his first large-scale suite, Soul Gestures in Southern Blues ...

Article

Trebor Jay Tichenor

(b Braidwood, IL, Nov 15, 1888; d Cincinnati, Oct 25, 1958). American ragtime composer and music educator. He grew up in Springfield, Illinois, where he learnt ragtime from two local pianists, Banty Morgan and Art Dillingham, and played professionally in the tenderloin district. After moving to St Louis about 1908 he studied the piano, the organ and theory, and composed and arranged for local theatres. He also transcribed rags by other composers for the music publisher John Stark, who issued Matthews’s five Pastime rags. Jelly Roll Morton, who visited St Louis at this time, recalled Matthews as ‘the best musician in town’. In 1915 Matthews took a position as church organist in Chicago and shortly thereafter one at the Berea Church in Cincinnati where he settled at the end of World War I There he earned a degree at the Metropolitan College of ...

Article

Rachel Antell

Dorothy Leigh Maynor (originally Mainor) was born to John J. Mainor, a pastor, and Alice Jeffries Mainor, in Norfolk, Virginia. At age fourteen, Maynor enrolled at Hampton Institute where she studied with the goal of becoming a public school teacher. During her college years, Maynor's focus increasingly shifted toward vocal training and the study of piano and orchestral instruments. After graduating, she decided to pursue a second degree in music from Westminster Choir College in New Jersey and then spent four years in New York continuing her musical studies privately under Wilfried Klamroth and John Alan Houghton.

In 1939 Maynor made her solo singing debut at the Berkshire Musical Festival in Tanglewood Massachusetts for which she received widespread acclaim The performance was soon followed by a New York debut at Town Hall where reviewers called her one of the most remarkable soprano voices of her generation ...

Article

Scott Yanow

jazz drummer, was born Charles Lawrence Persip in Morristown, New Jersey. Persip changed his first name from Charlie to Charli in the early 1980s. Two of his uncles were musicians. Persip studied drums in Newark, New Jersey, and attended Juilliard for two years in the late 1940s.

Persip began his career playing in Newark with saxophonist Joe Holiday and a variety of local bands. In 1953 he worked with pianist-composer Tadd Dameron and soon met Dizzy Gillespie. He entered the jazz big leagues when he joined Gillespie, working with the trumpeter's combos and his globe-trotting big band (1956–1957) between 1953 and 1958.

A very solid and swinging drummer Persip was one of the few who was equally at home playing with a small group or driving a big band Technically skilled he could play any music that was put in front of him and consistently ...

Article

Louis Allen Rawls was born and raised by his grandmother in Chicago, Illinois. Rawls began singing in his church choir at the age of seven. In the mid-1950s, Rawls and his friend Sam Cooke joined two other vocalists to form the Pilgrim Travelers, a Gospel group. After the group disbanded in 1959, Rawls sang in Blues clubs and cafés around Los Angeles. At one show, a producer from Capitol Records asked him to submit an audition tape. He soon released his debut album, Stormy Monday (1962). Lou Rawls Live followed in 1966, achieving gold status on the strength of its single “Love Is a Hurtin' Thing,” which reached number one on the Rhythm and Blues (R&B) charts. In 1967 Rawls won his first Grammy for Best Male R&B Vocals for the song “Dead End Street.” He won again in 1971 for A Natural ...