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Jean McMahon Humez

itinerant preacher, religious writer, and Shaker eldress, was born a free African American in Horntown, Pennsylvania. According to sketchy autobiographical information, she was the daughter of Jane Cox (maiden name unknown). No reference is made in her writings to her father, who probably died shortly after her birth. Rebecca Cox lived with her grandmother (never named) until she was between three and four years old, but by age six she was again living with her mother, who had remarried and was now called Jane Wisson or Wilson Her stepfather a sailor died at sea the next year At age ten she was in Philadelphia with her mother and a younger sister and infant brother the offspring it seems of a third marriage of her mother Responsibility for caring for her younger siblings seems to have deprived Rebecca of the schooling her mother was somehow able to ...

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Rebecca Cox Jackson was born in Horntown, Pennsylvania, into a free family. Her mother, Jane Wisson (or Wilson), died in 1808. Nothing is known of her father. Later she began living with her elder brother, Joseph Cox, who was a tanner and preacher at Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She married a man named Samuel S. Jackson and cared for her brother's four children, remaining childless herself.

According to her spiritual autobiography, Gifts of Power, which was rediscovered and published in 1981, Jackson experienced in 1830 a religious awakening during a thunderstorm that changed her life. She soon became involved in the early Holiness Movement, an early form of Pentecostalism that grew out of the Methodist Church. Jackson and her friend Mary Peterson began to hold prayer meetings which attracted large crowds This soon brought her into conflict ...

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Jean McMahon Humez

Rebecca Cox Jackson was a charismatic itinerant preacher, the founder of a religious communal family in Philadelphia, and a religious visionary writer. Though an important example of black female religious leadership and spirituality in the nineteenth century, she was virtually unknown after her death until the rediscovery and publication of her manuscript writings in 1981.

Jackson was born into a free black family in Horntown, Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia. She lived at different times in her childhood with her maternal grandmother and with her mother, Jane Cox (who died when Rebecca was thirteen). In 1830 she was married (to Samuel S. Jackson), but apparently childless, and living with her husband in the household of her older brother, Joseph Cox a tanner and local preacher of the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal AME Church in Philadelphia Jackson cared for her brother s four children while earning her own living ...