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Marion Arnold

South African sculptor and multimedia artist, was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. Her father’s family emigrated from Germany (her paternal grandfather was Jewish). She studied at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, graduating with a bachelor of fine arts degree and the Martienssen Student Prize in 1982 and completing her masters degree in 1988. She taught English and art at schools in Namibia and Cape Town before joining the Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town, as a part-time lecturer in 1996. She holds a professorship in sculpture and is resident in Cape Town. An intensely private person, Alexander rarely gives interviews or explains her work verbally.

In 1986 Alexander gained attention with a solo exhibition in Johannesburg. It included Butcher Boys (1985–1986 a disquieting depiction of three white life size naturalistic figures seated on a bench These self absorbed beings possessing animal and ...

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Mary (Polly) Nooter Roberts

Senegalese visual artist, was born in a rural Senegalese town in 1954 and moved to Dakar in 1973, where he received a degree in fine arts from the National Institute of the Arts of Senegal and his baccalaureate in 1979. He also earned a four-year degree in arts education from the National School of Art Education. Diba was then awarded a scholarship to pursue a doctorate in urban geography at the University of Nice, where he wrote a dissertation comparing human impact on the environments of Dakar and Nice. Since 1986 Diba has been a professor of visual arts at the National School of Art Education in Dakar and has served as president of the Senegalese National Association of Visual Arts He was one of the founders of Dak Art the Biennial of Contemporary African Art and serves on its Scientific Commission Diba has been instrumental in ...

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Sylvie Kandé

multimedia artist, philosopher, and educator, was born in Harlem, New York, the only child of Daniel Robert, a lawyer, and Olive Xavier Smith Piper, an administrator. Belonging to a light-skinned African American family, she was confronted early on by challenges that ultimately gave her work some of its unique characteristics, namely the firm assertion of her black identity, her unremitting fleshing out of racial stereotypes, and her commitment to cross-cultural bridge-building. Her involvement with the arts began in childhood: a piano prodigy and ballet dancer, she also took classes at the Museum of Modern Art in 1957. Her political consciousness was first shaped in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which she joined in 1962, and by the events surrounding the March on Washington in 1963, commemorated in her 1983 poster Think about It She graduated from New Lincoln School in ...

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Joanna Grabski

Senegalese artist, educator, and administrator, was born in Dakar, Senegal, on 18 May 1948. Sy became a practicing artist in the 1970s, a period when Senegalese artistic production moved away from its independence-era association with Négritude philosophy and the state patronage of President Léopold Sédar Senghor. Sy attended the National School of Art Education in Dakar, Senegal (1970–1976), as well as the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, Belgium (1976–1979), where his studies focused on drawing, painting, and printmaking. With his artistic sensibility forged in a cosmopolitan crucible, Sy’s ideas about art and artists developed with sensitivity to international perspectives. This orientation figured into both his individual artistic practice and his pedagogical approach at the National School of Fine Arts in Dakar, where he taught from 1979 to 1986. During his tenure as Director of the National School of Fine Arts from 1986 to 1996 he ...

Article

Elisabeth Harney

Senegalese visual artist and teacher, was born in 1931 near Dakar.

In 1947, Tall trained in an early private art studio in Dakar, run by the Frenchman Cosson. He then traveled in 1955 on a government scholarship to Paris to study at the École spéciale d’architecture. In 1959, Léopold Sédar Senghor, the philosopher, poet, and later first president of Senegal, saw some of Tall’s drawings on exhibit in Paris and encouraged him to pursue fine arts. Following this encounter, Senghor promoted the young Tall, supporting his application for a grant to attend the École Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris and to pursue further instruction in Sèvres, where Tall studied painting, serigraphy, tapestry, mosaics, and pedagogy.

Papa Ibra Tall is best known for the key role he played in postindependence Senegal as a teacher in the art school and as director in the national tapestry center Critics would characterize ...