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Robert C. Hayden

physician and cancer researcher, was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, the daughter of William Lafayette Chinn, a former slave who had escaped to the North from a Virginia plantation, and Lulu Ann Evans, a domestic worker. William Chinn had unsteady employment because of racial discrimination but occasionally worked at odd jobs and as a porter Raised in New York City May Chinn was educated in the city s public schools and at the Bordentown Manual Training and Industrial School N J and she attended Morris High School in New York A severe bout with osteomyelitis of the jaw plagued her as a child and required extensive medical treatment Though her family s poverty forced her to drop out of high school in the eleventh grade for a factory job she scored high enough on the entrance examination for Teachers College at Columbia University a year later to ...

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Susan Shifrin

was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, the only child of William Lafayette Chinn, a slave who had escaped to freedom at the age of eleven from the Chinn (Cheyne) plantation in Virginia, and his wife, Lula Ann Evans, who was born on a Chickahominy Indian reservation near Norfolk, Virginia.

When May was three years old her family moved to New York Her mother wishing to protect her from the distress caused by her father s alcoholism and determined that her daughter would receive a good education sent her at the age of five or six to boarding school at the Bordentown Manual Training and Industrial School Forced to leave school when she developed osteomyelitis May went to live with her mother on the estate of the Tiffanys the wealthy white family famed for its retail line of jewelry silver and china Although her mother was working for ...

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Kara M. McClurken

physician, chemotherapist, and educator, was born Jane Cooke Wright in New York City to Louis Tompkins Wright, a cancer researcher, surgeon, and civil rights leader, and Corrine Cooke, a teacher in the New York City school system. She attended Ethical Culture and Fieldston Schools before entering Smith College in 1938 where she initially contemplated a career in art rather than the sciences She loved to paint was a member of Smith s honorary art society and had served as the art editor of her high school yearbook Her father however feared that life as an artist would be an uncertain one and at the end of her sophomore year she chose a premed major Ultimately Jane Wright was drawn to the field because of a desire to serve with both the heart and mind Wright 7 She won a scholarship to New York Medical ...

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Amy M. Hay

Jane Cooke Wright demonstrates in her life the importance of family, institutions, and the professions to African American women. Wright continued a family tradition, following her paternal grandfather and father in attaining distinction in the medical profession.

Jane Cooke Wright was the first daughter of Louis Tompkins Wright and Corinne (Cooke) Wright. Her paternal grandfather graduated from the Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, a school renowned for educating black physicians. Her father went to Harvard Medical School and was one of that institution’s first black graduates. Wright attended private elementary schools in New York City and won a four-year scholarship to Smith College. She swam competitively in both high school and college, setting varsity records at Smith.

She obtained her medical degree, with honors, from New York Medical College in 1945 in an accelerated three year program She completed her internship and residency at Harlem Hospital In ...