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Charles Rosenberg

was born in Quincy, Florida, the daughter of Harrison Daniels and Amanda Daniels (maiden name unknown). It is commonly published that Maude was one of thirteen sisters, but the 1900 census shows that she was living with only one older sister, Georgia, born in 1889. Her mother, born in 1877, would have been no more than twenty-eight years old when Maude was orphaned by the age of six. She was raised in the home of her uncle, Dr. William J. Gunn of Tallahassee, Florida.

After attending St. Michael’s and graduating from All Angels schools in Tallahassee, she entered Florida A&M, completing her bachelor’s degree in 1922. She then completed training in nursing at the Georgia Infirmary in Atlanta. In 1921 she married William Dewer Callen. Although some sources place the couple’s arrival in Pineville, Berkeley County, South Carolina as early as 1923 in the early 1930s ...

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Heike Becker

the first Herero convert to Christianity, a translator, a teacher, and a midwife, was born in September 1837 as the daughter of Kazahendike and his wife Kariaavihe in Hereroland in what is today central Namibia. Her family was among those Herero who were impoverished and displaced by the conflicts that were ravaging central Namibia in the 1840s (especially those between Jan Jonker Afrikaner and Tjimuhua) and who subsequently gravitated toward the early missions in search of shelter and livelihood. Urieta Kazahendike was about ten or twelve years old when she came to live with German-born missionary Carl Hugo Hahn and his English wife Emma, née Hone, who had arrived in Namibia in 1844. Kazahendike lived with the Hahns first at Otjikango, about 70 kilometers north of Windhoek, which the missionaries called “New Barmen.” In 1855 she followed the Hahn family to Otjimbingwe to the west of Otjikango From ...

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Eunice Angelica Whitmal

was born to an enslaved mother in South Carolina. The names of her parents are not recorded, but Randon labored in the homes of the Boozie family, according to her granddaughter, Annie Mae Hunt. Little else is known about Randon’s early life. The Boozie family sold her parents and siblings, forever separating the family, until Randon was reunited with one of her sisters’ daughters.

The documented evidence of enslaved women s lives reveals the complicated double oppression of race and gender one that Randon had to endure as she navigated slave culture Among various historical resources the fear and threat of sexual violence and assault against black women is constant Unfortunately at thirteen years old Randon was not spared this indignity when living with her owners Perhaps seeking a moment of redress she disclosed to her mistress that she had been raped by the mistress s son The mistress did ...