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Caryn E. Neumann

physician and activist, was born Lena Frances Edwards in Washington, D.C., the youngest of three children of Thomas Edwards, a professor of dentistry at Howard University, and Marie Coakley. Dissuaded from becoming a dentist by her father, the young Lena instead set her heart on a medical career. She graduated from Dunbar High School as valedictorian in 1918 and enrolled at Howard University. Her plans were nearly derailed when she fell victim to Spanish influenza during the deadly epidemic of 1918. Edwards managed to sufficiently recover to quickly resume her studies. The experience of narrowly escaping the “purple death” may have influenced Edwards to cram as much as possible into every hour of every day remaining to her. She took summer classes at the University of Pennsylvania and earned a bachelor's of science from Howard in June 1921 after only three years of study Accepted ...

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Amy M. Hay

Edwards’s service was also recognized in 1967 when she received the Poverello Medal, awarded to individuals whose lives followed the ideals of Saint Francis of Assisi. Blessed with financial and familial support, her ministry to poor European immigrants and Mexican migrants, her own life of voluntary poverty, and her service to the African American community all made her a worthy recipient of such honors. She spent a lifetime addressing the needs of the poor, women, students, and the aged.

Edwards was born in Washington, DC. Her parents, Thomas Edwards, a professor of dentistry at Howard University, and Marie Coakley Edwards, had three other children. Edwards grew up in a middle-class family, part of the capital’s elite society at the time. At an early age she decided she wanted to become a doctor. She attended Washington’s Dunbar High School, graduating in 1917 as valedictorian She attended Howard ...

Article

Abdulai Abubakari

Ghanaian gynecologist and politician, was born on 15 April 1945 into the royal family at Sumniboma, a village near Nalerigu in the East Mamprusi District in Northern Region, Ghana. He was born Nasigrie Edward Mahama to the chief of Sumniboma, Kuloagnaa Nasigrie, and Madam Tani Nasigrie, who was a princess of Zambulgu, a village to the south of Sumniboma. His father died two months before he was born.

In 1953 Nasigrie’s elder brother G. Y. Mahama, who had just finished Aggrey Memorial College, was posted to Nalerigu as a court clerk and brought Nasigrie with him to attend Nalerigu primary school. Mahama then attended the Nalerigu Middle School and passed the common entrance examinations, to secure admission into the Government Secondary School in Tamale in September 1960 Although he was a promising athlete and a fine soccer player nicknamed Pelé after the Brazilian star Mahama focused on academics He ...