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Juanita Patience Moss

slave, Union soldier, and Andersonville prisoner, was born in Windsor, North Carolina, to unknown parents. His surname sometimes appears as Rolack. His physical description was that of a man five feet six inches tall with hazel eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion. Though historians have done much to illuminate the roles of black soldiers in black regiments, the U.S. Colored Troops (USCT), little has been done to document the experience and contributions of those who served with white regiments.

When Union regiments penetrated the Southern states to blockade Confederate access to the Atlantic coast for the exchange of cotton and tobacco for European guns and ammunition slaves began to abscond from nearby towns and plantations to seek out the Union troops whose presence promised freedom Not satisfied with being merely paid laborers behind Yankee lines some contrabands like Rolac chose to enlist in the Union army ...

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Sean Jacobs

South African politician and businessman, was born on 5 March 1953 in the then new township of Soweto, south of Johannesburg. His father worked as a clerk at Johannesburg General Hospital. As a child, Sexwale was a keen karate enthusiast, resulting in his receiving the nickname “Tokyo.” In 1973 he matriculated from Orlando West High School in Soweto. While at school Sexwale, a local student leader, had become a follower of Steve Biko’s Black Consciousness Movement. Shortly afterward he left South Africa. By then he had also become involved with the banned African National Congress (ANC). He joined Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK), the military wing of the ANC. In 1975 he completed a business degree at the now disbanded University of Botswana, Lesotho, and Swaziland. He later completed a military officers’ course in the Soviet Union.

In 1976 Sexwale reentered South Africa on a mission for MK but was ...