1-20 of 44 Results  for:

  • U.S. Representative x
Clear all

Article

Dorsia Smith Silva

physician, politician, and delegate to the U.S. Congress, was born Donna Marie Christian in Teaneck, New Jersey, to Virginia Sterling Christian and retired Chief District Court Judge Almeric L. Christian, from St. Croix. Christian-Christensen's parents wanted their daughter to understand her cultural connections to the Virgin Islands, so she spent part of her adolescence in St. Croix. This time in St. Croix had a profound influence on Christian-Christensen's career and commitment to helping others.

Christian-Christensen returned to the United States to graduate from St. Mary's College in Notre Dame, Indiana, where she earned a B.S. degree in 1966. After reading a United Negro College Fund booklet about the lack of minorities in health care, she decided to enter the medical field. She attended George Washington University Medical School and earned an M.D. degree in 1970. From 1970 to 1971 Christian Christensen worked an as ...

Article

Charles Orson Cook

politician, community activist, and sixteen-term United States congressman. William Clay Sr. was one of Missouri's most successful champions of civil rights in the twentieth century. Born one of seven children to Luella Hyatt and Irving Clay in Saint Louis, Missouri, young Clay attended Roman Catholic schools, where he was academically successful despite the disadvantages inherent in a segregated education. After high school, he enrolled in Saint Louis University and graduated with a bachelor's degree in political science in 1953. Clay completed a two-year tour of duty with the U.S. Army in 1955 After a brief flirtation with a career in business he became a labor organizer a community activist and ultimately a congressman from Missouri s First Congressional District for thirty two years Clay has spoken of the racial injustices he encountered early in life He recalled initiating a movement of black servicemen to desegregate the base swimming ...

Article

Mary Krane Derr

U.S.Congresswoman, was born Cardiss Hortense Robertson in Saint Louis, Missouri. She was the only child of Rosie and Finley Robertson, a domestic worker and a manual laborer, respectively. Cardiss's parents came from two different families with the same surname of Robertson. Rosie Robertson grew up on the Whiteville, Tennessee, farm of her great-grandfather, an ex-slave named Erastus White. Cardiss's parents separated during her infancy. Cardiss and her mother were so poor that their two-room apartment lacked a gas stove and refrigerator. They moved to Detroit when Cardiss was ten.

After graduating from the Detroit High School of Commerce, Cardiss moved to her maternal grandmother's home in Chicago. Initially a mattress factory seamstress, she eventually worked as stenographer for a carnival equipment business and then the Illinois Department of Labor. Attending night school courses at Northwestern University for twelve years, she achieved a business certificate in 1966 ...

Article

Daniel A. Dalrymple

Democratic Congresswoman Collins was a mainstay in the United States House of Representatives for more than twenty years. She was the first woman and African American to serve as the Democratic whip-at-large and the first African American to chair a subcommittee of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. Collins’s career was defined by her strong congressional record on a wide variety of issues, focusing on African Americans, women, and the environment. She was a congresswoman who refused to be pigeonholed as a single-issue representative and spoke up whenever she saw injustice.

Cardiss was born to the laborer Finley Robertson and the nurse Rosia Mae Robertson in St. Louis, Missouri. Her family relocated to Detroit in 1941 when she was ten years old. While in Detroit she attended Bishop and Lincoln Elementary Schools before graduating from the Detroit High School of Commerce. In 1958 Cardiss married George W. Collins before ...

Article

Joseph Wilson

U.S. congressman since 1965 who has been distinguished during his long career as a leading advocate for human rights and civil rights in the United States. Born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, John Conyers Jr. graduated from Northwestern High School in Detroit and then served in the Michigan National Guard (1948–1950) and the U.S. Army (1950–1954). During his time in the army he served in Korea as an officer in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Back in Michigan he acquired his BA in 1957 and his law degree in 1958, both from Wayne State University in Detroit. Before winning office in 1964 as a representative from Michigan, Conyers, a Democrat, worked as an assistant for the Democratic Michigan congressman John Dingell. As of 2008 Conyers and Dingell were the two longest-serving members of the U.S. House of Representatives.

During his tenure Conyers rose ...

Article

Fred Lindsey

U.S. congressman, was born in Detroit, Michigan, the first of five children of John Conyers Sr., a factory auto painter who became an international representative for the United Automobile Workers, and Lucille Simpson. John Conyers Sr.'s progressive politics proved a major influence on his son's life and career. Conyers grew up in a predominantly Italian American neighborhood in East Detroit and graduated from the city's Samson Elementary School in 1943, the year of a major race riot in the city. The riot and his father's political activism shaped Conyers's political consciousness, but his primary interest as a teenager was jazz. An accomplished trumpet player, he included among his friends in high school Sonny Stitt, Milt Jackson, and Betty Carter who all pursued careers in music Unchallenged by his school work Conyers spent much of his time in pool halls when not playing music He ...

Article

Timothy P. McCarthy

politician was born in Aiken South Carolina His father was a free black tailor and his mother was a cloak maker of Haitian descent their names are unknown Though several records claim that DeLarge was born into slavery it is more likely that his parents were free blacks who owned slaves This peculiar and paradoxical designation surely inspired the dual sensibilities that later characterized his political and social life as both an advocate for universal black enfranchisement and a member of South Carolina s propertied often exclusionist light skinned elite Fortunate to receive the benefits of the prewar education available to free black children DeLarge attended primary school in North Carolina and Wood High School in Charleston For a short time he was employed as a tailor and farmer and some sources indicate that he was also a part time barber During the Civil War he amassed some money ...

Article

Sholomo B. Levy

Congressman, author, and educator, was born Ronald Vernie Dellums in Oakland, California, the son of Vernie Dellums, a longshoreman, and Willa, a beautician and government clerk. Ronald's father had moved from Texas to California with the hopes of attending college and becoming a journalist. He first found work as a Pullman porter with his brother C. L. Dellums, a close associate of A. Philip Randolph in the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. C.L. was Ronald's childhood idol and even as a young man, Ronald admired his uncle's courage and fiery oratory when Governor Ronald Reagan appointed him to California's Fair Employment Commission. Though he never became a journalist, Vernie went on to become a union organizer among the dockworkers, and his voracious reading habits and work as a labor activist greatly influenced the trajectory of his son's life.

Ronald s parents were Protestants but they sent ...

Article

Zinga A. Fraser

politician and activist. Dellums has been described as one of the most radical members in congressional history because he constantly challenged America's political system. In his book, Lying Down with the Lions (2000), he discusses this apparent conflict between the role of a radical advocate and that of an effective legislator.

Ronald Vernie Dellums was born in Oakland, California. Prior to pursuing his educational career, he spent two years in the U.S. Marines. Majoring in social work and psychiatry, he earned an associate degree from Oakland City College in 1958, then a Bachelor of Arts from San Francisco State College in 1960 and a master s in social work from the University of California at Berkeley School of Social Welfare Dellums believed his specialization in psychiatric social work allowed him to help marginalized people navigate the social and structural problems of everyday life Against the ...

Article

Joseph Wilson

Michigan politician. Born in Detroit, Charles Coles Diggs Jr. attended the University of Michigan and Fisk University and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Following in his father's footsteps, Diggs worked as a funeral director in his family's business in Detroit, then was elected to his father's seat in the Michigan state senate in 1950. After sponsoring the state's Fair Employment Practices Commission, Diggs was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1954 as the first African American congressman from Michigan.

In the first year of his congressional career Diggs asserted leadership and became involved in the civil rights movement he spoke before ten thousand people attending a Mississippi conference organized by the largest civil rights group in the state the Regional Council of Negro Leadership Returning to Mississippi later that year he attended the notorious trial of the accused murderers of Emmett Till the ...

Article

Caryn E. Neumann

U.S. legislator. Julian Dixon, a Democrat from California, served for eleven years in the U.S. House of Representatives. Julian Carey Dixon was born in Washington, D.C., but grew up in California; his father was a labor organizer. After serving in the U.S. Army from 1957 to 1960, Dixon earned a bachelor's degree in 1962 from California State University at Los Angeles and a law degree from Southwestern University in Los Angeles in 1967.

Dixon served in the California Assembly from 1972 to 1978. In 1979 he entered the U.S. House of Representatives to serve the Thirty-Second Congressional District of California. A popular politician who won his last election in November 2000 with 84 percent of the vote Dixon represented a district that covered the historically black community known as mid city Los Angeles along with Baldwin Hills part of Koreatown and Culver City The area ...

Article

Susan J. McWilliams

congressman, lawyer, and activist, was born in Washington, D.C., the son of a postal worker. He attended the District of Columbia public schools in his middle-class black neighborhood until he was eleven, at which time he and his mother moved to Los Angeles. Raised to have a strong sense of loyalty, Dixon would remain committed to both Washington and Los Angeles throughout his life.

After graduating from Los Angeles's Dorsey High School, Dixon served in the army. He continued his education after his military service, receiving his BS from Los Angeles State College (later California State University in Los Angeles) in 1962 and going on to obtain his LLB from Southwestern University in Los Angeles in 1967. Dixon practiced law from 1967 to 1973, concomitantly serving as an aide to-the California state senator Mervyn Dymally It was while he was working in this capacity ...

Article

Howard N. Rabinowitz

Robert Brown Elliott was born probably in Liverpool, England, of unknown West Indian parents. Elliott's early life is shrouded in mystery, largely because of his own false claims, but apparently he did receive an English public school education (but not at Eton as he claimed) and was trained as a typesetter. It is likely also that in 1866 or 1867, while on duty with the Royal Navy, he decided to seek his fortune in America and jumped ship in Boston harbor, without, however, taking out citizenship papers. All that is known for certain is that by March 1867 Elliott was associate editor of the South Carolina Leader, a black-owned Republican newspaper in Charleston. Shortly thereafter he married Grace Lee Rollin, a member of a prominent South Carolina free Negro family. The couple had no children.

During Reconstruction South Carolina s population was 60 percent ...

Article

Howard N. Rabinowitz

Reconstruction politician and U.S. Congressman, was born probably in Liverpool, England, of West Indian parents whose names are unknown. Elliott's early life is shrouded in mystery, largely because of his own false claims, but apparently he did attend a private school in England (but not Eton as he claimed) and was trained as a typesetter. It is likely also that in 1866 or 1867, while on duty with the Royal Navy, he decided to seek his fortune in America and jumped ship in Boston Harbor, without, however, taking out citizenship papers. All that is known for certain is that by March 1867 Elliott was associate editor of the South Carolina Leader, a black-owned Republican newspaper in Charleston. Shortly thereafter he married Grace Lee Rollin, a member of a prominent South Carolina free Negro family. The couple had no children.

During Reconstruction South Carolina s population was ...

Article

Daryl A. Carter

congressman and the first Muslim to serve in the U.S. Congress, was born Keith Maurice Ellison in Detroit, Michigan, the third of five sons Clida Ellison, a social worker, and Leonard Ellison, a psychiatrist. The Ellison family was upwardly mobile, part of the rising black professional class of the post–World War II era, which sought to increase African American participation in the nation's civic life. His parents and his grandfather were active in the civil rights movement. Ellison graduated from the University of Detroit Jesuit High School and Academy in 1981 There he got his first taste of politics participating in student government In addition Ellison was active in sports Following his graduation he enrolled at Wayne State University in Detroit Michigan Ellison s time in college was transformational as he dispensed with the Roman Catholicism of his youth and converted to Islam This choice reflected the ...

Article

Alexander J. Chenault

the first black popularly elected governor of the United States Virgin Islands, Delegate to the United States House of Representatives, and ambassador, was born in Christiansted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, to Charles and Maude (Rogiers) Evans. He attended the Christiansted Public Grammar and Junior High schools and completed his secondary education at the Charlotte Amalie High School in St. Thomas, where he graduated as valedictorian of his class.

At the age of nineteen, Evans moved to Washington, D.C., and studied at Howard University, where he graduated magna cum laude in 1940. In 1944 he received his medical degree with honors from the Howard University Medical School. Evans married Mary Phyllis Anderson, a nurse he met while completing his medical internship at Harlem Hospital in New York City in 1945, and they had four sons together: Melvin Herbert Jr., Robert Rogiers, William Charles and ...

Article

Cathy Rodabaugh

Insisting that the Constitution made no provisions for slavery, Giddings consistently demanded that the government disentangle itself from any involvement with the institution. He believed that the “slave power,” wielding undue influence in Washington, withheld important rights from both northerners and bondpeople.

Joshua Reed Giddings was born in Pennsylvania to parents gradually migrating westward from Connecticut. His father, a failed farmer, moved the family again to New York's Burned-Over District, a region aflame with religious excitement, then finally settled amid other transplanted New Englanders in an area known as the Western Reserve, in Ashtabula County, Ohio. Largely self-educated and a diligent student, Giddings began law studies under Elisha Whittlesey, passing the bar exam in 1821 He married a schoolteacher from the area Laura Waters who later became a charter member of one the region s earliest antislavery societies One of their five children Laura Maria became a Garrisonian abolitionist ...

Article

Alston Fitts and Loren Schweninger

politician, was born a slave on a plantation near Columbus in Muscogee County, Georgia. Sold twice before becoming the property of Jonathan Haralson of Selma, Alabama, a lawyer and the head of the Confederate Niter Works, the self-taught Haralson remained in Dallas County as a freedman following the Civil War. There he married Ellen Norwood in 1870, and their son Henry (who later attended Tuskegee Institute) was born.

Unsure about the future of the Republican Party, Haralson entered politics in 1867 as a Democrat. A gifted orator who combined humor and wit with a discussion of serious issues, he campaigned in 1868 for Democratic presidential candidate Horatio Seymour, who, he said, “represented the true principles of philanthropy and national government” (Selma Times, 4 Nov. 1868). When Democrats failed to attract support from newly enfranchised blacks, Haralson switched his party allegiance in 1869 He and ...

Article

Debi Hamlin

North Carolina senator and U.S. congressman, was born a slave near Warrenton, Warren County, North Carolina. Nothing is known about his parents or his childhood. In 1861 Hyman worked as a janitor for a jeweler who with his wife taught Hyman to read and write. When that was discovered, the jeweler and his wife were driven from Warrenton, and Hyman was sold and sent to Alabama. Following the Civil War and his emancipation, having been at least eight times “bought and sold as a brute,” as he described it, Hyman in 1865 returned to Warren County, where he was a farmer and store manager. Sometime between 1865 and 1867 he became a trustee of one of the first public schools in Warren County.

Hyman's formal political career began in September 1866 when at the age of twenty six he was a delegate to the Freedmen s Convention of ...

Article

Debi Hamlin

Hyman, John Adams (23 July 1840–14 September 1891), North Carolina senator and U.S. congressman, was born a slave near Warrenton, Warren County, North Carolina. Nothing is known about his parents. In 1861 Hyman worked as a janitor for a jeweler who with his wife taught Hyman to read and write. When that was discovered, the jeweler and his wife were driven from Warrenton, and Hyman was sold and sent to Alabama. Having been at least eight times “bought and sold as a brute,” as he described it, Hyman in 1865 returned to Warren County, where he was a farmer and store manager. Sometime between 1865 and 1867 he became a trustee of one of the first public schools in Warren County.

Hyman s formal political career began in September 1866 when at the age of twenty six he was a delegate to the Freedmen s Convention of ...