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George Derek Musgrove

politician, was born Mervyn Malcolm Dymally in Cedros, Trinidad, to Hamid Dymally, an Indian businessman, and Andreid Richardson, a black Trinidadian. In Trinidad he attended Cedros Government School, St. Benedict School, and Naparima College, from which he graduated in 1944. Upon graduation Dymally took a job as a reporter for the Vanguard Weekly, the newspaper of the local oil workers union.

In 1946 Dymally immigrated to the United States to attend Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri, where he planned to study journalism. Unable to adjust to the environment in Missouri, however, he dropped out after one semester and traveled around the United States in search of work and school. After two years of constant travel and countless jobs Dymally settled in Los Angeles, California, and began attending Los Angeles State College, where he received his BA in Education in 1954.

After graduation Dymally ...

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Matthew K. Myers

Franciscan friar who converted to Islam and wrote polemical works supporting Islam against Christianity, was born in what is now known as Palma, Mallorca. Turmeda was his father’s only son and was possibly of Jewish descent. Mentioned as a witness in the will of James IV (c. 1336–1375), pretender to the throne of Mallorca, Turmeda’s father, Pere Silvestre, was a prominent figure in the community and a member of the weavers’ textile guild. Turmeda was conversant in both Catalan and Arabic as well as being experienced with Italian, French, Castilian, Latin, and Aramaic, allowing him to function as an interpreter and rise to positions of authority and prominence under the Hafsid Sultan of Tunis Abuʿl-Abbas Ahmad (r. 1370–1394) and his son Abu Faris ʿAbd al-Aziz (r. 1394–1434). The account of his conversion to Islam from Christianity is among the few such extant works.

Turmeda undertook training for the Christian priesthood ...

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Christine D. Baker

vizier of the Fatimid Caliph al-ʿAziz (d. 996) in Cairo, was born in Baghdad in 930. His full name was Abu al-Faraj Yaʿqub ibn Yusuf Ibn Killis. As a child, he traveled to Syria with his father where he eventually became a merchant’s agent in Ramla. Later in life, he traveled to Egypt, where he entered the service of the Ikhshid dynasty (935–969), who were nominal vassals of the ʿAbbasid Caliphate of Baghdad. In the service of the Ikhshids, Yaʿqub ibn Killis rose to preeminence as the chief of financial administration, but it was not until he entered the service of the Fatimid Caliphate in North Africa that he achieved his great renown.

Born a Jew Yaʿqub ibn Killis is famous for embracing Ismaʿili Shiʿism It is reported that he embraced Islam in 967 while in the service of the Ikhshids The Ikhshid governor Kafur 905 968 was so impressed ...