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Ginny Crosthwait

professor and educationaladministrator, was born Rosie Elizabeth Allen in Americus, Georgia, to Ulysses Grant Allen and Velma Douglas Allen. After completing a BS in Biology at Albany State College in Georgia, Allen-Noble taught in three Georgia high schools: the Vienna High and Industrial School (1960–1961), West Point High School (1962–1963), and Carver High School in Columbus (1963–1964). She also served as chairperson of the biology department at Columbia High School in Decatur, Georgia, from 1965 to 1970. Allen-Noble and Daniel Bernard Noble married in April 1964 and divorced in April 1968. They have one child, Antoinette Celine Noble-Webb.

While working on a master's degree in zoology at Atlanta University, Allen-Noble taught courses in biology, anatomy, and physiology at Spelman College, also in Atlanta (1965–1966). She completed the MS in 1967. From 1970 to 1976 she ...

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David W. Southern

Turner, Thomas Wyatt (16 March 1877–21 April 1978), educator and civil rights advocate was born in Hughesville Maryland the son of Eli Turner and Linnie Gross farmers The fifth of nine children born into a family of black Catholic sharecroppers Turner spent eight years in the racially segregated public schools of Hughes County before entering an Episcopalian school for African Americans at Charlotte Hall in adjacent St Mary s County In his two years at Charlotte Hall 1892 1894 Turner fell under the sway of two missionary educators who persuaded him that learning was next to godliness and that teaching was a noble profession From 1895 to 1901 he attended Howard University in Washington D C the first two years in preparatory school receiving an A B in biology in 1901 After teaching at Tuskegee Institute in 1901 1902 he taught in a Baltimore Maryland high school ...

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David W. Southern

educator and civil rights advocate, was born in Hughesville, Maryland, the son of Eli Turner and Linnie Gross, farmers. The fifth of nine children born into a family of black Catholic sharecroppers, Turner spent eight years in the racially segregated public schools of Hughes County before entering an Episcopalian school for African Americans at Charlotte Hall in adjacent St. Mary's County. In his two years at Charlotte Hall (1892–1894), Turner fell under the sway of two missionary educators who persuaded him that learning was next to godliness and that teaching was a noble profession. From 1895 to 1901 he attended Howard University in Washington, D.C. (the first two years in preparatory school), receiving an AB in Biology in 1901. After teaching at Tuskegee Institute in 1901–1902 he taught in a Baltimore Maryland high school for the next decade While there Turner earned an MA ...