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Mark Steven Maulucci

singer and guitarist known as “Kokomo,” was born in Lovejoy Station, Georgia, a small railroad town in Clayton County, approximately twenty‐five miles south of Atlanta. He was raised on a farm and learned some guitar from a relative named John Wigges, who was an accomplished knife‐style guitarist. In 1919 Arnold moved to Buffalo, New York, where he worked in a steel mill. After stops and similar jobs in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Gary, Indiana, Arnold moved to the Mississippi Delta in the late 1920s. He reportedly made a living as a bootlegger and throughout his life regarded his music as a sideline. He lived for a while in Glen Allan, Mississippi, and played with a partner named Willie Morris.

In 1930 Arnold made his recording debut as Gitfiddle Jim in a Memphis recording session for Victor The two songs Rainy Night Blues and Paddlin Madeline Blues displayed the ...

Article

Marieta Joyner

Gallaudet University handyman, was born to parents about whom nothing is known, perhaps in the vicinity of Washington, D.C. In 1870, when he was about nine years old, he wandered from the National Association for the Relief of Destitute Colored Women and Children in Washington and was found on a cold winter night on the streets by Senator Aaron Cragin of New Hampshire. Cragin soon realized that the boy was deaf and took him to Columbia Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb (later Gallaudet University). Compassion for blacks was not new for Senator Cragin; fifteen years earlier, in a 4 August 1856 speech he argued passionately in support of Charles Sumner of Massachusetts the Senate s leading opponent of slavery who had been beaten almost to death with a cane by Congressman Preston Brooks of South Carolina Cragin also knew that there was only one ...

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Eric Gardner

slave narrative author, was born in Wake County, North Carolina, to Barney and Cherry, two slaves of the High family. Jones's 1883 slave narrative lists his first owner as “Olser Hye,” asserts that his father was “a desperate wicked man” and an alcoholic who died about 1820, and tells of how his “poor dear mother” who taught him to pray was “traded for a tract of land and sent to Alabama.” (1). Jones and three of his eleven siblings were raised in the large High household; he says little about his childhood other than noting that “I had hard struggling to get bread and clothes” and “after I was ten years old I knew nothing about going to church.” (6). When his master's daughter Emily High married planter Tignall Jones on 25 January 1825, Friday Jones seems to have been given to the new couple.

In about ...

Article

Jacob Ganoe

janitor, Connecticut National Guard lieutenant, and founder of the first African American Boy Scout troop in Connecticut, was born in Nova Scotia, Canada. Little is known about his parents except that he was the second of four children. He had one older and younger sister, Alice and Martha, respectively, and one younger brother, Stephen. In the year 1887, at the age of ten, he, his mother, and his three siblings emigrated to America on the steamer Linda, arriving at Boston Harbor. His mother's name is listed as S. Saunders on the ship's manifest, so her real name is unknown. There is no record of his father. Saunders moved to New Haven, Connecticut, in 1892.

Saunders met his wife, Linna, who was born in January 1865, in Pennsylvania; the two married in 1890 They then settled down at 28 Hazel Street in New Haven Their ...

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Mary Krane Derr

children's home founder and director, was born into slavery in Georgia, as was her father. Her mother, also a slave, was born in Virginia. As a small child, Steele was orphaned. Unlike most slaves, Steele learned to read and write. After Emancipation she spent sixteen years as a train depot “matron” in Macon, Georgia. By 1880 Steele, one of Atlanta's first black property owners, resided in a two-room house at 112 Wheat Street near Piedmont Avenue. Wheat Street, later renamed Auburn Avenue, became black Atlanta's historic heart. The 1880 Federal Census recorded Steele's occupation as “dressmaker,” her race as “mulatto,” and her marital status as “widowed.” The identity of Steele's first spouse, the date of their marriage, and the number of children they may have had together are unclear. Steele evidently had at least one child, Bob Steele, according to his obituary in the Atlanta Constitution (31 Aug ...