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lawyer, businessman, and secretary of the army, was born in New York City, the only child of Clifford Leopold Sr. and Edith McAllister. Alexander's father, a Jamaican native, became an apartment building manager of Harlem's Young Christian Association. His mother was from Yonkers, New York, where she worked for a real estate firm. Later she headed the New York City welfare department. She was the first African American woman to get elected to the Democratic Party's Electoral College. In this position she became a prominent figure in the broader civil rights struggle. Both parents inspired Alexander's later work to end racial discrimination.

Alexander spent his childhood in New York City. He received his early education at the Ethical Cultural School and Fieldston Schools in the Bronx. After graduating from high school, Alexander went to Harvard University. Here he met McGeorge Bundy Harvard s Dean of Arts ...

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Camille Hazeur

mathematician, computer programmer, and consultant, was born Laura Cheatham on the west side of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the youngest of three daughters of Gertrude Richey and James Hammond Cheatham. Gertrude was born in Williamston, South Carolina, in 1888 to Mary Roberts and Mak Richey, who sent her to the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary (now Spelman College) in Atlanta, Georgia, from grade school through normal school. After receiving her teaching certificate, Gertrude took a job in Anderson, South Carolina, where she married James Hammond Cheatham, son of a wealthy white plantation owner, James Hammond Freeman, and a Cherokee woman named Emma Lenier. Previously married to a man of mixed race named Cheatham, Lenier had a long-established liaison with James Hammond Freeman, with whom she had five children. James Hammond Cheatham unable to take his biological father s name because of concubinage laws was apparently taught ...

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Juluette Bartlett Pack

president and chief executive officer of Oxen Hill Partners, a nationally known organization specializing in leadership development programs and brand enhancement strategies, was one of five children and the second daughter born to Ural Noble Langston, a construction worker, and Indiana Billingslea, a homemaker, in Canton, Georgia. Both Langston and her older sister, Patricia Ann were born in what was affectionately known as the “the Little House,” a wonderful three bedroom home built in the rear and to the side of the home owned by her paternal grandparents, Noble Langston and Roxie Upshaw. Her grandparents lived in “the Big House,” which was a lovely stucco and brick home that faced the highway that ran through the town of Canton.

When Marian was a year old her parents moved to Stratford Connecticut where they had three more children each one carrying a middle name in honor of ...

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Sharon M. Collins

businessman, was born James Hamilton Lowry in Chicago, Illinois, the younger of two sons of Camille (Caldwell) Lowry, a seamstress and postal worker, and William Abrose Lowry, a postal worker. Jim Lowry's parents had come to Chicago as children from America's rural South during the Great Migration. Grounded by their parents' race-consciousness and southern roots, Lowry and his brother, William Jr., were raised on Chicago's South Side in a comfortable and protected working-class black environment. He thrived in the strange paradox of black ghetto life in the 1940s and 1950s, which was close-knit and economically diverse and where successful black role models were visible and accessible. Lowry went to A.O. Sexton, a neighborhood elementary school, until recruited in 1953 into a high achieving private school known as the Francis W Parker School an overwhelmingly white but relatively egalitarian school on Chicago s affluent North Side ...

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Shennette Garrett-Scott

world-record-holding typist and business school owner, was born in Maryland and grew up in Washington, D.C. His father and mother's names and occupations are not known. Peters's father, a watchmaker, gave his eleven-year-old son a used typewriter. J. C. Wright, a teacher in the business department of Washington's Dunbar High School, recognized Peters's abilities and coached him to develop his exceptional typing speed and accuracy. Peters graduated from Dunbar High School in 1923. He first worked as a typist for a congressional committee. In 1926 Underwood Typewriter Company hired him as an “expert typing demonstrator.”

Peters won his first major typing title in April 1925 the Underwood Diamond Emblem from the Washington office of the Underwood Typewriter Company He typed an average of 109 five stroke words per minute for more than thirty minutes using one of Underwood s manual typewriters A few months later Peters shattered ...