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Joshunda Sanders

media mogul, model, and actress, was born Tyra Lynne Banks and grew up in Inglewood, California. Her father, Donald Banks, was a computer consultant, and her mother, Carolyn London, was a medical photographer and business manager. The couple divorced when Tyra was six years old, in 1980.

Banks attended Immaculate Heart Middle and High School, an all-girl's private school. She credited her mother's photography business and friends' encouragement with her ability to overcome a self-consciousness during her awkward adolescence that almost made her pursue another path.

“I grew three inches and lost 40 pounds in 90 days,” she told the Black Collegian in an interview about her teen years. “It was just this crazy growth spurt. I felt like a freak: people would stare at me in the grocery store.”

A friend encouraged her to try modeling during her senior year At the time several ...

Article

Sheila T. Gregory

radio and television pioneer, Masonic Christian Order founder, ordained Baptist minister, lawyer, community advocate, and business leader, was born on a sharecroppers' farm in Geneva, Kentucky, the son of Richard and Clara Banks, both tenant farmers. In June 1922 Banks graduated from the Lincoln Institute of Kentucky and moved to Detroit, Michigan, where he secured a job at the Dodge automobile main plant. He graduated from Wayne State University in 1926 and the Detroit College of Law in 1929. He briefly opened a criminal law practice, but after two years he discontinued his criminal work and invested in property during the Depression, while helping elect liberal Democrat and future Supreme Court justice Frank Murphy as Detroit's mayor in 1930.

In 1931 Banks was the head of the International Labor Defense League ILDL a legal organization known for defending numerous labor unions which at that time were ...

Article

Antero Pietila

pioneering African‐American broadcasting and advertising executive, who became the country's first black woman to own a radio station and, later, a television channel. Her innovative “urban contemporary” format of crossover music, first introduced on New York City airwaves in the 1970s, was copied throughout the industry, broadening the appeal of black stations to interracial audiences.

She was born in rural Georgia, the oldest of five children. Raised in Harlem, New York, she attended public schools and graduated with a business and finance degree from the Empire College of the State University of New York. In 1962, she started as an assistant comptroller at WWRL radio in New York City at $70 a week. She showed ability and determination, eventually rising to the assistant general manager.

Looking for challenges, in 1969 she cofounded Howard Sanders Advertising in New York The following year she invested $10 000 in a new ...

Article

Terri L. Norris

radio and television broadcasting entrepreneur and entertainment personality, was born Catherine Elizabeth Woods in Omaha, Nebraska, the eldest of four children of William Alfred Woods and Helen Jones Woods. Both of Hughes's parents had notable accomplishments. William Woods was the first African American to receive an accounting degree from Nebraska's Creighton University. Helen Woods was a trombonist with Mississippi's Piney Woods orchestra at Piney Woods Country Life School, an African American boarding school founded by her father, Laurence C. Jones, in 1909. This female orchestra, called the International Sweethearts of Rhythm, famously ran away from Piney Woods in pursuit of musical creative freedom; they sought to play swing music, not gospel. Her mother also earned a master's degree in Social Work.

Hughes spent her childhood in a low income housing project She was the first African American to attend Omaha s Duchesne Academy of the Sacred ...

Article

Jennifer Wood

founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Black Entertainment Television (BET), was born in Hickory, Mississippi, the ninth of ten children of Archie Johnson, a wood dealer, and Edna Johnson, a schoolteacher, respectively), but he spent most of his childhood in Freeport, Illinois. His father later became a factory worker and janitor. Robert Johnson, who is commonly known as Bob, was the only one of his siblings to attend college. He graduated with a BA degree in History from the University of Illinois in 1968. It was there that he met Sheila Crump, who would later become his wife. Johnson's interest in becoming an ambassador inspired him to earn an MA in Public Administration from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University in 1972 He then moved to Washington D C and worked for both the Corporation for ...

Article

Genevieve G. McBride

newspaper publisher and multimedia owner, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Mary Ellen Shadd Jones, later Mary Ellen Shadd-Strong, a journalist. A descendant of Mary Ann Shadd Cary, the first female African American publisher, his mother was a correspondent for the Chicago Defender and World in an era of an only intermittent presence for the black press in Wisconsin after the loss of the legendary Wisconsin Enterprise-Blade in the 1940s under J. Anthony Josey.

Lacking a stable local black press, African Americans in Wisconsin seemed almost silent amid the civil rights movement for most of the next decade. Several attempts at a black press in the state failed until Shadd-Strong founded an affiliate of the Defender in 1956; she maintained her Milwaukee Defender until 1960 McBride 343 344 The silence was deceptive however as struggling publishers of the period were literally and figuratively ...