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Joshunda Sanders

media mogul, model, and actress, was born Tyra Lynne Banks and grew up in Inglewood, California. Her father, Donald Banks, was a computer consultant, and her mother, Carolyn London, was a medical photographer and business manager. The couple divorced when Tyra was six years old, in 1980.

Banks attended Immaculate Heart Middle and High School, an all-girl's private school. She credited her mother's photography business and friends' encouragement with her ability to overcome a self-consciousness during her awkward adolescence that almost made her pursue another path.

“I grew three inches and lost 40 pounds in 90 days,” she told the Black Collegian in an interview about her teen years. “It was just this crazy growth spurt. I felt like a freak: people would stare at me in the grocery store.”

A friend encouraged her to try modeling during her senior year At the time several ...

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Patricia Hunt-Hurst

one of the pioneers of black women in fashion modeling, was born in Texarkana, Texas; she was the seventh of eight children. Her mother was a school teacher and her father a carpenter and farmer. Dorothy studied biology at Wiley College in Marshall, Texas, where she completed her degree in 1945. She planned to study medicine, but when her mother died she moved to Los Angeles to live with family. While there she earned a master's degree in education at the University of Southern California, married, and started her modeling career.

The fashion industry in the late twentieth century included the major fashion centers of New York and Paris New York was known for its American ready to wear and Paris for its couture or made to order dresses of original designs Fashion models were vital to the display of the designs in both facets of the ...

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Martha Pitts

fashion model, entrepreneur, and writer, was born in Oxford, Mississippi, the daughter of John Sims and Elizabeth Parham. Her father left the family when Sims was a baby, and her mother suffered a nervous breakdown when Sims was eight. She spent her childhood living with different foster families in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, separated from her sisters mother. This isolation, coupled with Sims's self-consciousness about her dark skin and tall stature—she stood five feet, ten inches at age thirteen—made her an insecure teenager. Nonetheless, Sims was urged by friends and family to try modeling. After graduating from Westinghouse High School in Pittsburgh, Sims moved to New York and enrolled in the Fashion Institute of Technology, where she studied merchandising and textile design. She also took evening classes to study psychology at New York University.

In New York Sims did not immediately try to become a model but financial ...

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Malaika B. Horne

model, entrepreneur, businesswoman, author, and philanthropist. Sims, an international beauty icon, was born in Oxford, Mississippi. Her mother, a divorcée, had a nervous breakdown when Naomi was eight. Separated from her mother and her two sisters, she spent the rest of her adolescence in foster homes. At age thirteen she was five feet, ten inches. Because she looked different, she became a target and was teased, bullied, and ostracized. She said her Catholic religion helped her achieve against all odds.

Sims moved to Pittsburgh Pennsylvania where she attended high school After graduating she enrolled into the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City but had to drop out because of financial problems She then worked as a fashion illustrator to support herself She carved out success in the fashion industry without an agent simply calling up prestigious modeling agencies in New York City and offering her services One contract ...

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Claranne Perkins

entrepreneur, lifestyle expert, author, and model, was born Barbara Smith near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the daughter of William H. Smith, a steel worker, and Florence Claybrook Smith, a part-time maid. She has described her parents as the original Bob Villa and Martha Stewart referring to the television handyman and the multimedia domestic guru respectively and was greatly influenced by the home her parents established She assisted them in the family s vegetable and flower gardens While in high school Smith studied cooking sewing nutrition and fashion During the same time she took classes at the John Robert Powers modeling school in Pittsburgh on the weekend She completed her modeling studies shortly before she graduated from high school After graduation Smith moved to Pittsburgh where she worked hard to launch her modeling career It was not easy but in the late 1960s after a national ...

Article

Paul Stillwell

pioneer black naval officer, was born in Murphreesboro, Tennessee, one of two children of Frank E. Sr. and Rosa Sublett, who were divorced in 1931. When Sublett was about five years old, the family moved to Highland Park, Illinois, and a year later to Glencoe, Illinois, another Chicago suburb. Sublett spent most of the rest of his life in Glencoe. His education in the first eight grades was in Glencoe, and he then went to high school in nearby Winnetka. He was among the very few black students in the high school, from which he graduated in 1938, but he later recalled that he encountered no prejudice there (Stillwell, 149). As a teenager he got his first exposure to service life when he attended Citizens Military Training Camp at Fort Riley, Kansas, for two summers. He spent the 1938–1939 school year at the University of ...

Article

Nancy T. Robinson

actress, seamstress, and model, was born Donessa Dorothy Van Engle in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City to Fred Van Engle, a tailor, and Mynita Duncan. Her mother was born in Massachusetts to Willis and Mabelle Duncan, with whom the family lived at the time of Van Engle's birth. Her father, Fred Van Engle, was born on the island of Saint Kitts and worked as a tailor.

Van Engle was born during the Harlem Renaissance and lived in the same apartment building as the boxer Jack Johnson and the actress Lena Horne with whom she was friends The Harlem Renaissance represented a creative boom and a period of recognition for African Americans in music art literature politics dance theater and business for those from and living in Harlem considered the cultural haven for African Americans In her Harlem neighborhood Van Engle mingled with ...