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Jeremy Rich

religious and educational leader, was born to a family of chiefs in the town of Rusengo in eastern Burundi. The names and occupations of his parents are not known. He attended primary school in Rusengo from 1927 to 1933 and completed his secondary education at the Mugera seminary from 1933 to 1939. Barakana then decided to complete his theological training to become a Roman Catholic priest. He underwent training at the seminary in Nyakibanda from 1939 to 1947 and was ordained on 25 July 1947. Soon afterward, he went to the Vatican to study for a doctorate in canon law, which he received in 1950. Barakana thus became the first Burundian to ever receive a doctorate. Barakana decided to join the Jesuit Catholic religious order and officially became a member of this order on 20 May 1953 at Djuma in the Democratic Republic of the Congo ...

Article

Huel D. Perkins

Joseph Samuel Clark was born in Bienville Parish near Sparta, Louisiana, the son of Phillip and Jane Clark. His early schooling occurred near his birthplace, through the assistance of whites, while he maintained his share of the family responsibilities. Between 1891 and 1895, Clark studied in the preparatory department of Coleman College, Gibsland, Louisiana, working his way through school. He matriculated at Bishop College in Marshall, Texas, but received no degree. From 1896 to 1901 he attended Leland College in New Orleans, Louisiana, from which he received a B.A. degree in 1901. Additional studies resulted in an M.A. from Selma University in Alabama (1913) and honorary Ph.D. degrees from Leland College, Louisiana, (1914) and Arkansas Baptist College (1921). He did postgraduate study at Harvard University, in Massachusetts, and the University of Chicago, in Illinois.

Clark involved himself in several organizations ...

Article

Thomas D. Pawley

Born October 31, 1870, on a farm in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, 10 km (6 mi) south of Starkville, Gandy was the fifth of thirteen children born to Horace and Mary (Goodwin) Gandy, freed slaves and tenant farmers. His paternal grandfather, Ed Gandy, had come to the United States from Ireland following the potato famine of the 1830s, settling first in South Carolina, later in Alabama, and finally in Mississippi. His maternal grandmother was of mixed French, Native American, and black origin. Given the middle name Mumphis, which he disliked, he later changed it to Manuel. His mother, whose gentle nature contrasted with his father's, exerted a great influence on him.

Like so many other blacks during this period Horace and Mary Gandy were trapped by the economic servitude imposed on them by the tenant farmer system In an effort to escape the unending cycle of debt ...

Article

David Michel

was born on 3 April 1934 in Morgan Forest, Jamaica. His mother was a member of the Church of God (COG), which had begun work in Jamaica in 1918. The COG is a predominantly white Pentecostal denomination based in Cleveland, Tennessee that welcomes women ministers as evangelists and practices faith healing. Saved in 1952, Grey was later baptized and became a member of the Aenon Town COG. He started to preach and got elected deacon at the same church.

In 1955 the COG organized its first two congregations in Wolverhampton and Birmingham, England. The following year Grey moved to Leeds and worked as a bus conductor. In 1958 he married his first wife, Phebe Joanna Betty, a teacher, with whom he had twelve children. In April 1959 Grey began prayer meetings in Leeds which the COG in England formally organized as a new congregation with Grey as ...

Article

Lester C. Lamon

Born on September 26, 1876, in the eastern Tennessee hamlet of Retro, William Jasper Hale spent his formative years in close association with white paternalism. Because there was no public education for rural blacks, he obtained the basic essentials of learning in the Quaker and Northern Presbyterian-supported schools in Maryville, Tennessee. Although his training was limited, Hale had influential white contacts in Chattanooga. These contacts not only ensured him initial employment, but also served as the foundation upon which he built his career. After starting in a small black elementary school, Hale soon parlayed his outstanding administrative talents and his white connections into the most important black post in the Chattanooga system: principal of the black Saint Elmo secondary school. Still, neither his ambitions nor his talents had been fully extended.

When the 1909 state legislature provided for the founding of an Agricultural and Industrial State Normal ...

Article

Lois Massengale Schultz

community activist, was born Jane Roberta Whatley in Hayneville, Lowndes County, Alabama, the eighth child and only girl of fifteen children born to Minerva Kendall Whatley and Calvin Whatley, a sharecropper and laborer. At an early age Jane worked to help support the family, and by the age of sixteen she was selling insurance for the Atlanta Mutual Benefit Association.

Summers's lifelong commitment to helping others was instilled at an early age by her parents, who had been born into slavery. A family story passed down through the generations had an enormous impact on young Jane. Relatives told how her father, Calvin, at the age of five carried water to his enslaved father, Simon, who had been beaten, tied to a tree, and left to die. Simon was subjected to this torturous punishment because he had protested the master's sexual abuse of his wife.

In 1922 ...