1-9 of 9 results  for:

  • Performing Arts x
  • Radio and Television x
Clear all

Article

Sandra Y. Govan

A Los Angeles native and later resident of Vancouver, Washington, Steven Emory Barnes is the third African American author after 1960 to have chosen science fiction and fantasy writing as his primary profession. Barnes established himself through the 1980s as a determined and disciplined writer, one who had followed a cherished childhood dream to become a commercially successful professional writer.

The youngest child of Emory F. Barnes and Eva Mae (Reeves) Barnes, Steven Barnes grew up in Los Angeles. He attended Los Angeles High, Los Angeles City College, and Pepperdine University, Malibu, California (1978–1980 At Pepperdine he majored in communication arts but withdrew from school before completing a degree frustrated because he thought no one on the faculty could teach him about building a career as a professional writer It was not until Barnes made contact with established science fiction writer Ray Bradbury who sent the novice ...

Article

Evan Mwangi

Moroccan novelist, dramatist, and radio commentator and producer, was born on 15 July 1926 in the French Moroccan town of Mazagan (present-day el-Jadida), near Casablanca. His father was a fairly liberal tea merchant who regarded European education as a vestibule to a better Moroccan society. As a young boy Chraïbi received his early education in a local qurʾanic school, but when the family moved to Casablanca a little later, he joined a French school. In 1946 he left for Paris to study chemical engineering, graduating in 1950. However, he abandoned his graduate studies in neuropsychiatry just before receiving his doctorate. He traveled across Europe and to Israel, settling in France with his first wife, Catherine Chraïbi (née Birckel), and their children.

From 1952 Chraïbi devoted himself to literature and journalism, and in 1954 he began writing for the National Radio and Television Broadcasting System Ranging from epics to comedy ...

Article

SaFiya D. Hoskins

actor, was born Robert Peter Williams in St. Louis, Missouri, where he was raised with three siblings by his maternal grandmother, Jeanette Williams. His grandmother worked as a laundress at a Catholic rectory to support her family. According to his New York Times obituary, he never knew his father, and his mother, Zoe Bertha Edwards, was an alcoholic and a prostitute. He moved in with his grandmother after his stepfather attacked him with a red-hot poker. Early on, Guillaume had a passion for music; he enjoyed singing and participated in school musicals. He sang in the church choir and served as an altar boy; alternately, he spent much time hanging around pool halls and in ninth grade was expelled from parochial school due to his uncontrollable temperament. At age eighteen, in 1945 Guillaume enrolled in the United States Army fifteen months later he resigned receiving an honorable ...

Article

Debbie Clare Olson

filmmaker, producer, director, playwright, writer, and cultural critic, was born in Newark, New Jersey, but spent most of his childhood in North Carolina. Little is known about his family. After high school, Moss moved to Baltimore and attended Morgan State College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1929. He also attended Columbia University in New York City, where he formed a troupe of black actors called “Toward a Black Theater.” The troupe toured around New York City and performed at various black colleges.

Moss was active in the theater and radio and acted in his first film, The Phantom of Kenwood, in 1933. The film was directed by Oscar Micheaux, one of the more prolific early black filmmakers. Between 1932 and 1933 Moss wrote three dramas—“Careless Love,” “Folks from Dixie,” and “Noah”—for a radio series called The Negro Hour ...

Article

SaFiya D. Hoskins

actress, singer, was born Phylicia Ayers-Allen in Houston, Texas, the second-oldest child of Dr. Andrew Arthur Allen, a dentist, and Dr. Vivian Elizabeth (Ayers) Allen, a poet and educator. Her father is of Cherokee descent; her mother, an African American, won a Pulitzer Prize nomination for her first published work, Spice of Dawns. Ayers-Allen's siblings, like their mother, embraced the arts; her older brother Andrew Arthur “Tex” Allen Jr. became a jazz musician; her younger sister Debbie Allen is an actor, choreographer, and director who won an Emmy Award for her role on the television series Fame; her youngest brother Hugh Allen is a real estate banker In the 1950s Ayers Allen moved with her family to Mexico where she learned to speak Spanish fluently Ayers Allen attended Jack Yates Senior High School in her hometown and at the same time began studying ...

Article

Daniel Douglas

stand-up comedian and screen actor, also credited as a director and film producer. Christopher Julius Rock III was born in Andrews, South Carolina, to Julius and Rosalie Rock, and he was raised in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, New York. He began working as a comedian in the late 1980s; discovered by Eddie Murphy, the relationship led to a small role in Beverly Hills Cop 2 (1987) and a regular spot on Saturday Night Live, ending in 1992.

Rock briefly appeared on the Fox network program In Living Color in 1994. His first record, Born Suspect, was released in 1991. Rock then left the television circuit to pursue a film career. Though he appeared in almost a dozen films during the next eight years—including So I Married an Axe Murderer (with Mike Myers) and CB4 for which ...

Article

Steven R. Carter

and contributor to the Black Arts movement and regional theater. Soon after Ted (Theodis) Shine's birth in Baton Rouge, he and his parents, Theodis and Bessie, moved to Dallas where he grew up. At Howard University he was encouraged to pursue satiric playwriting by Owen Dodson, who tactfully indicated Shine's limits as a tragic writer. His play Sho Is Hot in the Cotton Patch was produced at Howard in 1951. Graduating in 1953, Shine studied at the Karamu Theatre in Cleveland on a Rockefeller grant through 1955 and then served two years in the army. Earning his MA at the University of lowa in 1958, he began his career as a teacher of drama at Dillard University in 1960, moving to Howard University from 1961to 1967 and then settling at Prairie View A M University where he became a professor and head ...

Article

Michael Adams

football player, sportscaster, actor, director, screenwriter, and producer, was born in Gary, Indiana, where his father was a steelworker and his mother a homemaker. Williamson earned a track scholarship to Northwestern University, where he studied architecture, but football coach Ara Parseghian recruited him for an additional spot. After college Williamson played for the San Francisco 49ers in 1960 before jumping to the National Football League's new rival, the American Football League. In four seasons with the Oakland Raiders and three with the Kansas City Chiefs, he was an outstanding defensive back, earning the nickname “The Hammer” for his practice of hitting opposing players in the head with his forearm while tackling them.

Williamson's “unsportsmanlike” play earned him great notoriety. Before the first Super Bowl, played in January 1967, he boasted that he would knock Green Bay Packer receivers Boyd Dowler and Carroll Dale ...

Article

Mary Anne Boelcskevy

actor and playwright, was born Frank Henry Wilson in New York City. Little is known about his family and early life, although it is known that he attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. Wilson supported himself with a job as a postman while also pursuing his acting and writing career.

Wilson began his career in vaudeville, spending twelve years as a baritone singer, but his true calling was the stage, where he worked as a playwright and as an actor. Wilson's career as a playwright began in 1914 when he wrote one act plays for the Lincoln and Lafayette theaters in Harlem During these early years of the century African American leaders organized a push for recognition of African American arts as a road to civil rights Wilson s career as playwright and actor was set in the midst of early debates over the form and definition ...