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Stacy Braukman

radical black nationalist and anti-prison activist, was born George Lester Jackson in Chicago, Illinois, the second of the four children of Robert Lester Jackson and Georgia (maiden name unknown). George Jackson attended St. Malachy, a Catholic school located in what he later described as the “heart of the ghetto,” from kindergarten through ninth grade (Jackson, Soledad Brother, 5). In 1956 Robert Jackson transferred his postal job to southern California, and he took young George with him—in large part to remove him from his increasing involvement in local gangs and from his minor scuffles with police. The two drove from Chicago to Watts, California, and were soon joined by the rest of the family.

In Watts George Jackson engaged in an escalating series of petty thefts and acts of rebellion against local police officers and he was arrested three times over the next two years He spent several months ...

Article

George Lester Jackson grew up on the West Side of Chicago, the son of Lester Jackson, a postal worker, and Georgia Jackson. He was the second oldest of five children. Street-smart and rebellious, Jackson had several run-ins with the law for petty crimes by the time he was ten. His family moved to Los Angeles in 1956, where Jackson's troubles with the law continued, and included several arrests for robbery. Paroled in June 1960 after serving time for a gas station holdup, Jackson was arrested later that year for a gas station robbery that netted seventy-one dollars. Due to his previous convictions, he received an indeterminate sentence of one year to life. He was nineteen, and remained in prison for the rest of his life.

While in prison, Jackson studied the writings of Karl Marx, Frantz Fanon, Mao Zedong, Fidel Castro and ...

Article

Christopher Tucker

former member of the Black Panther Party (BPP) and a fugitive from the United States Federal government, was born Felix L. O’Neal Jr. in Kansas City, Missouri, son of Felix L. O’Neal Sr. and Florence F. O’Neal. O’Neal was raised on 12th Street in segregated Kansas City, near an area known as the 18th and Vine district, which remains well known for its jazz, barbeque, and African American culture. After World War II Felix Sr. worked as a laborer for the Kansas City Water Department, eventually retiring as a foreman. “From as far back as I can remember, up until 1953 my family and I lived in a dilapidated ghetto three story building each floor had six two room apartments with a shared toilet and bath tub in the hall I shudder to recall how cramped we were O Neal explains My father was a very hard worker ...