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Daryl A. Carter

mayor of Philadelphia, was born Michael Anthony Nutter in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Basil, a drug company sales representative and part-time plumber and Catalina Bargas Nutter, a worker at Bell Telephone. He grew up in West Philadelphia and attended St. Joseph's Preparatory School in North Philadelphia. His prep experience imbued Nutter with an intellectual curiosity about life, work, politics, and race. He studied the work and writings of Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and joined the school's Black Culture Club. Even at an early age Nutter was concerned with social justice for those he believed were dispossessed, repressed, or otherwise exploited by the mainstream society. At the same time, he developed an interest in music and the post–civil rights movement of black culture and politics. Nutter was a strong student and earned a B.A. in Business in 1979 from the prestigious Wharton School ...

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Charles Rosenberg

attorney, West Virginia state legislator, business owner, founder and president of the West Virginia conference of NAACP branches, sometimes known in public as T. Gillis Nutter, was born in Princess Anne, Somerset County, Maryland, the son of William Nutter and Emma Henry Nutter.

He was educated in public schools in Maryland, and awarded the L.L.B. degree from Howard University Law School on 28 May 1898. For two years afterward he taught school and was a principal in Fairmount, Maryland. Nutter was admitted to the bar in Marion County, Indiana, in 1900, and moved to Charleston, West Virginia, in 1903 He established his reputation as a defense lawyer by convincing a jury in the Grice murder case to convict a black man charged with killing a white man of voluntary manslaughter rather than murder then in the case of Campbell Clark charged ...

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Melissa Nicole Stuckey

pharmacist, bank owner, and mayor of an African American community, was born David Johnson Turner, the fifth of twelve children, to Moses and Lucy (Lulu) Turner in Cass County, Texas. During his teen years, the Turners joined the steady stream of African Americans who left Texas and other Southern states for the Oklahoma and Indian Territories. Many black migrants were attracted to Indian Territory, which was divided up among the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians, known as the Five Civilized Tribes. Moses and Lulu Turner rented a farm in the Seminole Nation, Indian Territory, where David Turner and his younger siblings came of age.

In 1895, Turner wed Minnie also a child of Texas migrants and the young couple began raising their own family on a rented farm near Turner s parents Within a few years however Turner moved his family to ...