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James Jankowski

Egyptian politician, athlete, and explorer, was born in Bulaq on 31 October 1889. He was the son of Shaykh Muhammad Hasanayn of al-Azhar and the grandson of Admiral Ahmad Pasha Mazhar Hasanayn. Hasanayn received his early education in Cairo, then at Balliol College, Oxford. A skilled fencer, in 1920 he captained the Egyptian team at the Olympic Games in Brussels. In the early 1920s, he was commissioned by King Fuʾad to explore Egypt’s Western Desert. The Lost Oases (1925) is his own account of his expedition of 1923 on which he traveled from Egypt’s Mediterranean coast through the Libyan Desert, discovering the “lost” oases of Arkenu and Ouenat, and for which he received the Founder’s Medal of Britain’s Royal Geographical Society. In the hope of establishing a long-distance flight record, in 1929 he learned to fly; plagued by malfunctioning aircraft, he eventually abandoned the effort.

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Article

Elizabeth Heath

A son of missionary parents, Frederick John Dealtry Lugard was born in Fort St. George, Madras, India. He was educated in England and trained briefly at the Royal Military College, which he left at the age of twenty-one to join the British army. While in the army, Lugard was posted to India and also served in Afghanistan, Sudan, and Burma (present-day Myanmar). In the late 1880s, however, Lugard left the army to fight slavery in East and Central Africa. In 1888 Lugard led his first expedition in Nyasaland (present-day Malawi) and was seriously injured in an attack on Arab slave traders. A year after he established the territorial claims of British settlers, in the hire of the British East African Company, Lugard explored the Kenyan interior. In 1890 he led an expedition to the Buganda kingdom in present day Uganda Lugard negotiated an end to the civil war in ...

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Allen J. Fromherz

explorer, was born on 3 June 1910 in a tukul hut of mud and wattle in Addis Ababa Abyssinia now Ethiopia He was the son of Captain Wilfred Gilbert Thesiger head of the British legation to Ethiopia He idealized his childhood in Abyssinia and later wrote of it sympathetically as a time of savagery and color He said My childhood was spent in Abyssinia I loathed cars aeroplanes wireless and television in fact most of our civilizaton s manifestations in the past fifty years Maitland 30 31 This negative attitude toward Westernization would follow him through his life and he took pride in being considered one of the last great explorers from the Victorians Golden Age Thesiger s family had a long history in Africa and the young Thesiger was influenced by one ancestor in particular Lord Chelmsford known for his role as commander in the Anglo Zulu ...