1-8 of 8 results  for:

  • Jazz Musician x
  • Percussionist x
  • Musicianship and Singing x
Clear all

Article

Nathaniel Friedman

jazz drummer, was born Edward Joseph in New Orleans, Louisiana, to unknown parents. He grew up steeped in his hometown's musical tradition, influenced by two tap‐dancing siblings to take up the drums. New Orleans percussionists like Paul Barbarin were Blackwell's earliest models, making him one of several future avant‐gardists whose roots were in jazz's oldest traditions.

In 1951 Blackwell relocated to Los Angeles, where he played in the rhythm and blues outfits of Plas and Raymond Johnson. More significantly he made the acquaintance the saxophonist Ornette Coleman with whom he would be associated for his entire career Coleman also working with various degrees of success in the Los Angeles rhythm and blues scene sought to introduce an unprecedented degree of melodic harmonic and rhythmic freedom into jazz This new approach required an almost telepathic bond between band members as interaction was governed by little more than improvisational ingenuity In ...

Article

Jeremy Rich

musician, was born on 27 October 1933 in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo during the era of Belgian colonial rule when the city was known as Léopoldville. Little is known about his parents or early life, but in his youth he moved to Brazzaville, the capital of the neighboring Congo-Brazzaville (then a French colony), situated across the Congo River from Kinshasa. After he graduated from the respected Ecole Professionielle secondary school in Brazzaville in 1953, Ganga became a technical artist for a timber company, even though he had received a degree in carpentry. However his real interest lay in music. He played drums on the early Joseph Kabasélé song “Para Fifi,” recorded in 1953. Ganga, a talented athlete, also played soccer for the Racing Club team in Brazzaville. He found a new job in 1954 working as a clerk for Shell ...

Article

Scott Yanow

jazz tenor saxophonist, was born in Summit, Missouri, and grew up in Chicago. His parents’ names and occupations are not recorded. He began studying the clarinet when he was 14 under the guidance of the legendary teacher Capt. Walter Dyett at the city's DuSable High School.

Gilmore served in the U.S. Air Force from 1948 to 1952, switching to tenor saxophone so he could play with the Air Force band. After his discharge, he worked with the short-lived Earl Hines Big Band back in Chicago in 1952.

In 1953 Gilmore joined the Sun Ra Arkestra, an association that lasted for 40 years. His relationship with Ra had similarities to altoist Johnny Hodges's situation with Duke Ellington Gilmore was Ra s top soloist no matter what style of music the band was performing He could play hard bop with the best tenors By the mid 1950s ...

Article

Donald Roe

jazz musician, philanthropist, and black Republican. Lionel Hampton's career as a musician spanned seven decades, during which he became a jazz icon. While Hampton was an excellent drummer, his mastery of the vibraphone and his popularity as a bandleader enabled him to stamp his unique signature on jazz. He presented music to the people with panache, exuberance, and showmanship. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on 20 April 1908, but moved to Chicago with his maternal grandmother, Louvenia Morgan, after his mother, Gertrude, remarried following the apparent death of his father, Charles, during World War I. Morgan enrolled Hampton in the Holy Rosary Academy, a Catholic School in Collins, Wisconsin, to protect him from the mean streets of Chicago. He learned to play the drums in the academy's fife and drum corps.

Hampton s grandmother was a conservative evangelical Christian but she encouraged his interest in secular ...

Article

Sholomo B. Levy

vibraphone pioneer, philanthropist, and big band leader, was born in Louisville, Kentucky, to Charles Edward, a railroad worker, and Gertrude Morgan, a waitress. Lionel's father was sent to France as a combat soldier during World War I and was soon declared missing in action. When his family could not learn of his whereabouts, they presumed that he had been killed. Mrs. Hampton had returned to her parents in Birmingham, Alabama, where Lionel was entrusted to his grandparents, Richard and Louvenia Morgan Lionel considered them to be his parents after his mother remarried and started a new family After achieving fame Lionel had a brief reunion with the father he thought he had lost three decades earlier when a fan told him of an elderly man who had been blinded in the war and living in a Veterans Administration hospital in Ohio who told everyone ...

Article

Scott Yanow

jazz drummer and bandleader, was born in Pontiac, Michigan. He was the younger brother of the pianist Hank Jones and the cornetist-arranger Thad Jones, and his parents were Henry and Olivia Jones. Inspired by watching the drummers in circus parades, he was originally self-taught on the drums, starting at a young age. Jones played in his school band and, while serving in the military from 1946 to 1949, he was in an Army band.

A major part of the fertile Detroit jazz scene, Jones played in the house group at the Bluebird Inn during 1949–1952 and worked with many local musicians, including his brother Thad Jones and the tenor saxophonist Billy Mitchell. He also accompanied national artists who were passing through town, such as Miles Davis.

After moving to New York in 1955 Jones auditioned for Benny Goodman s band but did not make it ...

Article

After the death of Mario Bauzá in 1993, Tito Puente became the last of the early innovators of Afro-Latin Jazz to continue to be musically active. Although best known as a bandleader and Timbales player, Puente was a multi-instrumentalist, performing on a wide range of percussion instruments as well as on piano and saxophone. For over half a century, he was a dynamic entertainer, emerging in the 1980s as a pop-culture celebrity.

Puente was born in the Spanish Harlem section of New York City. He had hoped to become a dancer, but an ankle injury led him to choose an instrumental career instead. As a youth, he played percussion and piano in the local band Los Happy Boys. He performed with Machito, Fernando Alvarez and others while still a teenager He served three years in the United States Navy during World War II and received his ...

Article

For more than thirty years, Cuban-born Mongo Santamaría led one of the top-rated bands in Afro-Latin jazz, yet he remains far less well-known than bandleaders Machito and Tito Puente, who rose to prominence during the 1940s and 1950s. Many scholars and musicians rank Santamaría as the most influential Cuban percussionist since Chano Pozo. He continued to play—well into his seventies—with remarkable speed and authority, employing complex polyrhythms that invariably swung. During the 1960s he created a distinctive fusion of Latin jazz and Soul Music—anticipating the funky bugalú fad—that brought him considerable crossover success, including a Top Ten hit with “Watermelon Man” (1962).

Although he began by studying violin, Santamaría soon switched to drums, dropping out of school to become a professional conga drummer. In 1948, after having established himself as a performer in Cuba, Santamaría went to Mexico City with his cousin Armando Peraza ...