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Kahlil Gross

entrepreneur, was born in Berkley, Virginia, to Joshua Phillips and Ellen Douglass. At a time when Jim Crow was being established throughout the South and education for African Americans in the public school systems was made separate and clearly unequal, stemming from the Supreme Court's ruling on Plessey v. Ferguson in 1896, Mr. and Mrs. Phillips made sure that their daughter received the best education afforded to her. Sarah attended public schools in Berkley, and then went on to attend Lincoln Preparatory School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Norfolk Mission College for Negroes in Norfolk, Virginia. At some point, she went on to do advance work in chemistry at Columbia University.

Around the age of sixteen, Sarah became a dressmaker. Her parents encouraged her to become a school teacher, however, in 1913 at age twenty four Sarah decided to pursue an entrepreneurial path opening a small hair dressing ...

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Richlyn Faye Goddard

Madame Sarah Spencer Washington started a cosmetics empire that turned her into one of America’s first black millionaires. A dressmaker from 1905 to 1913, she was then a hairdresser from 1914 to 1915, and a manufacturer of beauty preparations from 1919 until her death.

Born in Berkley, Virginia, to Joshua and Ellen (Mother Spencer) Phillips, Sarah Spencer received her early education in the public schools of Berkley and attended the Lincoln Prep School in Philadelphia. As a young woman, she walked seven miles a day from her home in Berkley to attend school. She graduated from the Norfolk Mission College. Her first job was in the Norfolk printing office of the Elk leader Finley Wilson. She also later studied business administration at Columbia University and described herself as a devout Christian Scientist and a full-fledged Republican. She admired Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown ...