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Iman  

Caryn E. Neumann

model and cosmetics-company founder, was born Iman Abdul Majid in Mogadishu, Somalia, the second of five children born to Mohamed, an Ethiopian-born Arabic teacher and diplomat, and Marian Abdul Majid, a Somalia-born midwife. “Iman,” a name generally given to a boy, means “to have faith in Allah.” As the first girl born to her father's family in three generations, Iman appeared as a gift from Allah.

Very much a “daddy's girl,” Iman worshipped her father. A fighter against sexism, Mohamed adhered to the theory that girls should be treated well at home to enable them to surmount any restrictions that society might try to place upon them. Accordingly, Iman was sent to boarding school because her father felt that such an environment offered girls the best education.

To his delight Iman did well in her studies of Arabic Italian geography and mathematics She eventually left boarding school ...

Article

Tiffany M. Gill

The dawn of the twentieth century witnessed the materialization of the black beauty culture industry and the emergence of the black female beauty industry mogul. Annie Turnbo Malone, while not as well known as her contemporary, Madam C. J. Walker, pioneered many of the methods and goals of this global enterprise and transformed the role of African American women in business.

Annie Turnbo Malone was a child of the Reconstruction Era. Her father, Robert Turnbo, fought for the Union in the Civil War while her mother, Isabella Cook Turnbo fled their native Kentucky with their two children Eventually the family reunited in Metropolis Illinois and the couple had nine more children Annie was second youngest Robert and Isabella Turnbo died while Annie was young and her elder sisters raised her After moving to Peoria Illinois Annie attended high school where she acquired a fondness for chemistry which combined ...

Article

Richlyn Faye Goddard

Madame Sarah Spencer Washington started a cosmetics empire that turned her into one of America’s first black millionaires. A dressmaker from 1905 to 1913, she was then a hairdresser from 1914 to 1915, and a manufacturer of beauty preparations from 1919 until her death.

Born in Berkley, Virginia, to Joshua and Ellen (Mother Spencer) Phillips, Sarah Spencer received her early education in the public schools of Berkley and attended the Lincoln Prep School in Philadelphia. As a young woman, she walked seven miles a day from her home in Berkley to attend school. She graduated from the Norfolk Mission College. Her first job was in the Norfolk printing office of the Elk leader Finley Wilson. She also later studied business administration at Columbia University and described herself as a devout Christian Scientist and a full-fledged Republican. She admired Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown ...