1-3 of 3 results  for:

  • Photographer x
  • 1941–1954: WWII and Postwar Desegregation x
  • Ethnic Groups x
Clear all

Article

Darren Newbury

South African photographer, was born on 18 January 1932 in Vrededorp, Johannesburg. He grew up in the suburb of Sophiatown, the cultural center of urban black life in Johannesburg until its destruction in the 1950s under the Group Areas Act. He was educated first at the Lutheran School and then at Western Native High School. His father sold fruit and vegetables from a cart, and at weekends he would go with him to Johannesburg’s white suburbs. His family had a strong sense of independence, and conflicts with the authorities over passes and trading licences were a feature of his early life. The tough environment of Sophiatown also influenced his decision to train as a boxer.

His interest in photography began while still at school, when his father gave him a Kodak Brownie; but it was not until he came across Drum magazine that he began to think of ...

Article

Darren Newbury

Malian photographer, was born in 1935 or 1936 in the village of Soloba in southern Mali (then part of the French Sudan). His family were livestock farmers, and from a young age he learned how to herd animals and work the land. In the mid-1940s he was sent away to school in Bougouni, 100 miles south of the capital, Bamako. Once at school, Sidibé quickly began to demonstrate a talent for drawing, winning prizes and getting his work noticed by a local colonial administrator, Maurice Necker, and the new colonial governor, Emile Louveau. With their support, in 1952, he moved to Bamako to attend the École des Artisans Soudanais, where he studied jewelry-making.

His first engagement with photography came at the end of his school career in 1955 when the French photographer Gérard Guillat selected him to decorate his studio and shop Photo Service Guillat subsequently hired Sidibé Initially ...

Article

Darren Newbury

South African photographer, was born Constance Stuart in Cornwall, England, on 7 August 1914, the daughter of a Scottish mining engineer and the wife he met while studying in Cornwall. The family emigrated the year Constance was born. Her father went ahead taking up a post as manager of a tin mine at Groenfontein, northern Transvaal; mother and daughter followed when the latter was aged three months. The marriage did not last and in 1920 Stuart-Larrabee moved with her mother to Pretoria, where she was educated at Arcadia School and Pretoria High School for Girls.

Her enthusiasm for photography was first sparked when she received a Kodak Box Brownie for her tenth birthday. She learned to process her own pictures and in 1930 exhibited eight contact prints at the Pretoria Agricultural Society Show. In 1933 she travelled to Europe to study photography She went first to Regent Street ...