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Jeff Berg

was born in Brooklyn, New York to Ruby Nottage, a child psychologist, and Wallace Nottage, a schoolteacher. She describes her parents as “black bohemian folks” since her childhood home was often visited by artists, writers, and musicians (Iqbal). Her mother and maternal grandmother, who was from the Barbados, both worked in support of civil rights and women’s rights, ultimately serving as sources of inspiration for Nottage and her work.

Nottage attended St. Ann’s School in Brooklyn and the High School of Music and Art in Manhattan, where she also studied piano, graduating in 1982. Following her graduation from Brown University in 1986 and the Yale School of Drama in 1989, Nottage went to work for Amnesty International as its national press officer until resigning in 1993 to pursue a full time career in writing Her interest in writing began at age eight when she was motivated by ...

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Steven R. Carter

and contributor to the Black Arts movement and regional theater. Soon after Ted (Theodis) Shine's birth in Baton Rouge, he and his parents, Theodis and Bessie, moved to Dallas where he grew up. At Howard University he was encouraged to pursue satiric playwriting by Owen Dodson, who tactfully indicated Shine's limits as a tragic writer. His play Sho Is Hot in the Cotton Patch was produced at Howard in 1951. Graduating in 1953, Shine studied at the Karamu Theatre in Cleveland on a Rockefeller grant through 1955 and then served two years in the army. Earning his MA at the University of lowa in 1958, he began his career as a teacher of drama at Dillard University in 1960, moving to Howard University from 1961to 1967 and then settling at Prairie View A M University where he became a professor and head ...