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Mariana Isabel Lorenzetti

who specialized in jazz. Some sources (e.g., Ortega, 2007) give his date of birth as 20 February 1909, in the locality of Machagai, Chaco Province, in the far north of Argentina. Others (e.g., Gaffet, 2002) record his birthplace as the city of Resistencia, Chaco’s capital. Oscar Alemán was the son of Marcela Pereira—of the indigenous Qom, or Toba people—and of the amateur guitarist Jorge Alemán Moreira, who was born in Uruguay. He was the fourth of seven children in his family.

Alemán began to explore the world of music at a very young age, mostly through self-instruction. According to the family of the musician Guilldermo Iacona, at 6 years old, in 1915, Oscar belonged to a group called Moreira Sextet, along with his father and siblings Rodolfo, Carlos, Jorgelina, and Juana (Iacona et al., 2012 As a member of that group he delivered his ...

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Jason Philip Miller

was born Pinkney Anderson in the small town of Laurens in southwestern South Carolina. Little is known about his early years or upbringing. He apparently learned to play guitar at a very early age and by the time he was ten years old could play the open tuned guitar, common in blues music. He was something of a natural showman, earning small change by dancing for passersby on the streets of Greenville and Spartanburg, to which his family relocated during his childhood. Sometime probably around 1914 or 1915 he fell in with Frank Smiley Kerr his first name is variously recorded though whether this is due to error or because Kerr went by different names is unclear purportedly a doctor whose Indian Remedy Company peddled various potions and nostrums of a more or less fanciful nature As part of the show Anderson played his guitar between pitches Remarkably he ...

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Mark Steven Maulucci

singer and guitarist known as “Kokomo,” was born in Lovejoy Station, Georgia, a small railroad town in Clayton County, approximately twenty‐five miles south of Atlanta. He was raised on a farm and learned some guitar from a relative named John Wigges, who was an accomplished knife‐style guitarist. In 1919 Arnold moved to Buffalo, New York, where he worked in a steel mill. After stops and similar jobs in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Gary, Indiana, Arnold moved to the Mississippi Delta in the late 1920s. He reportedly made a living as a bootlegger and throughout his life regarded his music as a sideline. He lived for a while in Glen Allan, Mississippi, and played with a partner named Willie Morris.

In 1930 Arnold made his recording debut as Gitfiddle Jim in a Memphis recording session for Victor The two songs Rainy Night Blues and Paddlin Madeline Blues displayed the ...

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Barry Kernfeld

jazz guitarist, was born in Somerville, Massachusetts, near Boston, the son of an apartment superintendent. His parents' names are unknown. The family was musical and closely in touch with the world of entertainment: “Fats Waller used to come by the house all the time,” Ashby told the writer James Haskins Ashby taught himself to play guitar At age fifteen he joined a band that played sophisticated arrangements for college dances and deeply embarrassed by his inability to read music he began to learn chordal notation He performed at a nightclub at Revere Beach while attending Roxbury Memorial High School Ashby s abilities as a classical guitarist won him a scholarship at an open audition for the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston but the school had no guitar teacher and thus the award went to the runner up So that s the extent of my conservatory background ...

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Mariana Isabel Lorenzetti

accompanied Carlos Gardel, the celebrated singer of Argentine tangos, with his compositions and music. He was born on 25 September 1894 in the neighborhood of San Cristóbal in the city of Buenos Aires. He was self-taught, and his father, Tristán Barbieri, helped him develop his talent for the guitar from a young age. At the age of 17 he married Rosario Acosta, with whom he had five children: María Esther, Carmen Luz, Adela, Guillermo Oscar, and Alfredo Barbieri (who was Carlos Gardel’s godson). He was the grandfather of Carmen Barbieri, who is today a well-known actress and comedian. The anthropologist Norberto Cirio (2012) confirmed in his writing that Barbieri’s ancestors were of African descent.

In 1916, Barbieri began to play with his accompanist Luciano Cardelli, nicknamed “El tanito,” playing serenades and baptisms in the neighborhoods of the city of Buenos Aires. According to the tango historian Horacio ...

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Timothy D. Taylor

(b St Louis, 18 Oct 1926; d Wentzville, MO, 18 March 2017). American rock and roll singer, songwriter, and guitarist. Born into a solid working-class black family, he worked at a variety of jobs before pursuing a career in music. He achieved success rather late; his first number one hit, Maybellene, was recorded in 1955 when he was 29. During the 1950s and 60s he wrote a number of hit songs which have become rock and roll standards, including Roll over Beethoven, Too Much Monkey Business, Brown-Eyed Handsome Man, School Days, Back in the USA, Little Queenie, Memphis, Tennessee, and Johnny B. Goode Berry s songs were based on 12 bar blues progressions with variations ranging from 8 to 24 bars played at fast tempos with an emphasis on the backbeat He ...

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John Edwin Mason

singer, songwriter, and guitarist, was born Charles Edward Anderson Berry in St. Louis, Missouri, the fourth of six children of Henry William Berry, a carpenter and handyman, and Martha Bell Banks. The industrious Henry Berry instilled in his son a hunger for material success and a prodigious capacity for hard work, traits that were not entirely apparent in Berry as a youth. Martha Berry, a skilled pianist and accomplished singer, passed on to her son her love for music. By the time he was a teenager, however, Berry preferred jazz, blues, and the “beautiful harmony of country music” to his mother's Baptist hymns (Berry, 14).

In 1944 Berry and two friends hatched an ill considered plan to drive across the country to California They soon ran out of money and committed a series of armed robberies in an attempt to return home All three were ...

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Timothy J. O'Brien

rock-and-roll pioneer. Chuck Berry is truly the father of rock and roll. His vibrant songwriting, innovative guitar playing, and live performances inspired legions of followers, and he was the single most important figure in defining a new genre that mixed country and rhythm and blues.

Charles Edward Anderson Berry was born to Henry William Berry Sr., a carpenter, and Martha Bell Banks, a housewife, in Saint Louis, Missouri, in 1926. The family belonged to a Baptist church, and Berry's earliest memories were of his parents singing gospel songs around the house. His first try at show business, singing “Confessin’ the Blues” to a friend's guitar accompaniment at a high school talent show, inspired him to play guitar.

While still in high school in Saint Louis he left for a trip to California with two friends When their money ran low they robbed a few small businesses and ...

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Frank E. Dobson

blues guitarist, singer, and songwriter. The blues performer known as Bo Diddley was born Ellas Otha Bates in McComb, Mississippi, to Eugene Bates, a father whom he never knew, and Ethel Wilson, a teenage mother. He was raised by his mother's first cousin Gussie McDaniel, and when his adoptive father, Robert McDaniel, died in 1934, Gussie moved the family to Chicago.

Diddley first studied music as a child under Professor O. W. Fredrick while attending Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church in Chicago While attending Foster Vocational High School in Chicago he studied various instruments including the guitar harmonica and trombone His sister bought his first guitar for him when he was twelve During his high school years he also formed a band the Hipsters later called the Langley Avenue Jive Cats In the late 1940s Diddley tried his hand at a number ...

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Gordon Root

Djalma Andrade received the stage name Bola Sete while playing guitar in a small jazz band in which he was the only black member. Bola Sete means “ball number seven,” the only black ball in Brazilian billiards.

Bola Sete began his formal music education at the Conservatory of Rio de Janeiro where he studied classical guitar. His early influences, including Andrés Segovia, Django Reinhardt, and Charlie Christian, reveal the young artist's interest in both classical music and jazz. His passion for these two genres remained constant throughout his career. As a young man he also played in various Samba and choro groups two Brazilian musical genres with roots in the nineteenth century composing numerous pieces including one of his best known early compositions Cosminho no Choro As a result of his exposure to jazz classical and Brazilian popular music the guitarist became familiar with a variety ...

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Paul Oliver

(b Scott, MS, June 26, 1893; d Chicago, Aug 14, 1958). American blues singer and guitarist. He grew up in Arkansas, where he lived on a farm until he was in his late 20s. After working as a fiddle player in the rural South, he settled in Chicago in 1920. There he learnt to play the guitar, on which he was already an outstanding performer when he began to record ten years later. In the late 1930s and the 1940s he was sympathetically supported by Joshua Altheimer or Black Bob Hudson on the piano in a manner reminiscent of Leroy Carr and Scrapper Blackwell.

One of the most prolifically recorded of black American blues singers Broonzy formed a link between the country and urban blues traditions playing with a light lilting style Some of his recorded blues are poetic statements complemented by moaning ...

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Bill McCulloch and Barry Lee Pearson

blues singer and guitarist, was born William Lee Conley Broonzy in Scott, Bolivar County, Mississippi, the son of Frank Broonzy and Nettie (or Mittie) Belcher, former slaves who became sharecroppers. One of at least sixteen children, including a twin sister, he lived in Mississippi until age eight, when his family moved to Arkansas, near Pine Bluff, to try sharecropping there. As a youngster he made violins out of cornstalks, learning music from an uncle, Jerry Belcher and a local musician known as See See Rider He and a friend began playing homemade instruments to entertain local children though always out of sight of his parents stern Baptists who frowned on secular music The parental disapproval eased however when he graduated to a real instrument supposedly bought for him by a white patron and began earning money as a musician When he was twelve the family moved to Scotts ...

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William Lee Conley Broonzy was born to sharecropper parents in Scott, Mississippi; during his childhood he moved with his family between Mississippi and Arkansas, farming in both states. Broonzy first played music on homemade fiddles and guitars, and was performing at special occasions by the age of fifteen. Between the ages of fifteen and twenty he developed his dexterous hollering vocal style, as well as his characteristically facile guitar technique. Music, however, remained but an avocation for Broonzy until he resettled in Chicago after serving in the army during World War I.

In the 1920s Broonzy embarked on a struggle to subsist as a professional musician a struggle that continued until the last few years of his life Throughout the decade he made numerous live appearances in Chicago nightclubs yet he failed to garner much interest from record companies In the 1930s however his luck changed with the explosion ...

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Charles D. Grear

musician, performer, songwriter, and southern musical legend. Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown—“Gatemouth” because of his deep voice—emerged as a musical legend in the South for more than fifty years. Brown was heavily influenced by the music of Texas and Louisiana, and his range of styles included the blues, rhythm and blues (R&B), country, swing, jazz, and Cajun. A virtuoso on guitar, violin, mandolin, viola, harmonica, and drums, Brown influenced and was influenced by performers as diverse as Albert Collins, Eric Clapton, Frank Zappa, Lonnie Brooks, Guitar Slim, and Joe Louis Walker. Throughout his career he recorded more than thirty albums. Those who have been featured on his albums include Eric Clapton, Ry Cooder, Amos Garrett, Jim Keltner, Maria Muldaur, and Leon Russell.

Born on 18 April 1924 in Vinton Louisiana Brown was raised in Orange Texas ...

Article

blues singer, songwriter, guitarist, and fiddle player, was born in Vinton, Louisiana, and moved across the Sabine River with his family to Orange, Texas, when he was a few weeks old. He began playing the fiddle when he was five, learning the instrument from his father, Clarence Brown Sr.—a railroad worker who played and sang everything from traditional French songs to German polkas—and taught himself to play the guitar when he was ten. Brown's mother, Jenny, played the piano.

As a boy Brown would hang outside the local jazz clubs, and once when he was listening to Duke Ellington practice the musician invited him to sit with him on the piano bench Brown claimed he acquired his nickname when a high school teacher said he had a voice like a gate though he long promised to reveal the true account of how he became ...

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Mark Steven Maulucci

Little is known about his early years, but his death certificate states he was a “tenant farmer” born in Clarksdale in 1900 and died in Tunica, Mississippi, in 1952. It’s more likely that he was born between 1890 and 1895, as he was already working and married to guitarist Josie Bush around 1911. Adding to the mystery and lore of Willie Brown is the fact that both his first and last names were the fifth most popular in the United States at that time and even more so in the Delta region. There were two other known William Browns who sang and played guitar around his time.

What is known is that Brown lived and worked on the Yeager Plantation near Drew, Mississippi, and was rather small statured. Around 1916 he met and heard Charley Patton who was based on the nearby Dockery Plantation With his ...

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Scott Yanow

jazz and rock guitarist, was born in Osaka, Japan, to parents serving in the American military, and he grew up in Baltimore. Bullock first played piano at the age of three, studying at the Peabody Conservatory of Music and giving his first public performance when he was six. He learned to play the saxophone when he was eleven and played the double bass at junior-high rock dances. When he was sixteen, he switched permanently to the guitar after he heard the English guitarist and jazz-rock-fusion pioneer John McLaughlin.

Bullock studied music at the University of Miami, making the acquaintance of such fellow students as Pat Metheny (with whom he studied) and Jaco Pastorius. During his college years, he worked in local night clubs, which gigs included playing with the rhythm-and-blues singer Phyllis Hyman When Hyman moved to New York Bullock accompanied her Very shortly after his arrival in ...

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Sunny Nash

Grammy Award–winning guitarist, composer, and jazz educator, was born Kenneth Earl Burrell in Detroit, Michigan, during the Depression to parents about whom little information is available. It is known that he was the youngest of three sons, and that his family enjoyed music as part of their daily lives. His mother played piano and sang in the choir at Second Baptist Church, Detroit's oldest black congregation. Burrell's father played banjo and ukulele, which may account for Burrell's and his brother's mastery of stringed instruments.

Because there was a piano in the home, it became the first instrument Burrell played as a child. He performed once before an audience in a school auditorium. Listening to saxophonists like Lester Young and Coleman Hawkins saxophone was his first love but his family could not afford to buy him one Burrell began playing guitar and at age 12 settled for the inexpensive instrument ...

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Bill McCulloch and Barry Lee Pearson

blues singer, was born Armenter Chatmon in rural Hinds County, Mississippi, about fifteen miles west of Jackson, the son of Henderson Chatmon and Eliza Jackson, both farmers. His father was also a musician whose reputation as a fiddler dated back to country dances in the days of slavery. His mother played guitar. All nine brothers and one sister in the family played various instruments. Armenter Chatmon nicknamed “Bo,” played violin, guitar, bass, banjo, and clarinet, learning mainly from an older brother, Lonnie. Another brother, Sam, whose later recollections constituted the main body of information about the family, said Lonnie was born early in the 1890s and was the first to learn music, so he taught each of the younger siblings.

It was Bo Chatmon who first organized the musical siblings as a business enterprise around 1917 Working in various groupings as they came of age brothers Bo Lonnie ...

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Scott Yanow

jazz guitarist, was born Albert Aloysius Casey in Louisville, Kentucky. Details of his parents are unknown. Casey grew up as an orphan, living with uncles and aunts who performed as the spiritual group Southern Singers. Casey took violin lessons for a brief time, but he switched to ukulele and guitar as a young teenager, inspired by a cousin who played those two instruments. At first he played guitar mostly by ear. In 1930 he relocated with his family to New York City.

In 1933, when Casey still in high school, he met pianist Fats Waller, who knew one of his uncles. Waller was impressed and promised him a job after he graduated. In 1934, when Casey was eighteen, he became a member of Fats Waller and His Rhythm. At Waller's instigation, he also studied guitar at Martin Smith Music School for two years. Between 1934 and 1942 ...