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Robert "Bob" Davis

one of the four North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University freshmen who initiated the sit-in movement in Greensboro, North Carolina, was born Franklin Eugene McCain in Union County, North Carolina, the son of Warner and Mattie McCain. McCain grew up in Washington, D.C., and graduated from Eastern High School in 1959. After graduating, he returned to his native North Carolina to attend college at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (A&T). During his time as an undergraduate student at A&T, McCain roomed with David Richmond and lived around the corner from Ezell Blair Jr. and Joseph McNeil on the second floor of Scott Hall. These four men challenged public accommodation customs and laws in North Carolina on 1 February 1960 launching a sit in movement that became an important catalyst for much of the modern civil rights movement They decided to sit at an all ...

Article

Barbara Worley

During the 1930s Max Theiler developed vaccines that protected millions of people from the incurable tropical affliction known as yellow fever. For his contributions, he was awarded the 1951 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. Born in Pretoria, Theiler studied medicine at the University of Cape Town, leaving for England in 1919 for Saint Thomas’s Hospital Medical School, London, where he completed his medical training in 1922. That year, he moved to the United States, joining the Department of Tropical Medicine at the Harvard Medical School. In 1930 he accepted a post with the Rockefeller Foundation in New York City. He remained with the foundation until 1964 when he became professor of epidemiology at Yale University New Haven Connecticut At Harvard Theiler s early research interest was in amebic dysentery but he soon switched his efforts to yellow fever An important finding during the 1920s was that ...

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Stephen Wagley

South African medical researcher and Nobel Prize winner active in the United States, was born in Pretoria, Transvaal (South African Republic, later South Africa), on 30 January 1899, the son of Arnold Theiler, a veterinarian, and Emma Jegge.

Theiler studied at Rhodes University College, Grahamstown, before entering the two-year premedical program at the University of Cape Town; he graduated in 1918. He left for London in 1919 and underwent medical training at Saint Thomas’ Hospital, University of London, receiving a diploma of tropical medicine and hygiene in 1922; he was denied the MD because the university did not recognize his studies at Cape Town. He never received an academic degree.

While taking a course at the London School of Tropical Medicine, he met Oscar Teague of Harvard University, who offered him a position there. Theiler moved to the Harvard University School of Tropical Medicine in 1922 where ...