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Daniel Douglas

businessman and politician. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, McCall earned his bachelor's degree at Dartmouth College in 1958. At the time the prestigious school only matriculated eight African American students each year. He furthered his education at the Andover Newton Theological Seminary, where he earned a master's degree in divinity. He also studied at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. He is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ. McCall is also a member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first Greek letter organization established for African Americans.

McCall's career in public service began as deputy administrator of the New York City Human Resources Administration from 1965 to 1969. From 1975 to 1979 he represented Harlem's Twenty-eighth District in the New York State Senate. He left that position when President Jimmy Carter nominated him to serve as a deputy United Nations ambassador McCall served in this ...

Article

Michaeljulius Idani

minister, civil rights activist, New York state legislator and official, and ambassador, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the oldest of six children of Herman Carl McCall Sr., a waiter on a train, and Carolesa McCall a homemaker During his early years McCall s father lost his job and abandoned the family leaving Herman s mother struggling to raise him and his five sisters McCall grew up poor in the Roxbury section of Boston shifting through low income housing His mother collected welfare as a means to support the family they also received support from caring members of their United Church of Christ parish Despite the difficulties of being a single parent she was active in his life and stressed the importance of a good education and a close relationship with God McCall was a talented student and knew he wanted to attend college He ...

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Robert Jr. Johnson

Massachusetts legislator, and civil rights and women's rights champion, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the son of William Mitchell and Clara (Green) Mitchell, of whom nothing is known. It is probable that he had a brother, William. Other than the fact that he trained and worked as a printer, little is known of Mitchell's early life. When the Civil War broke out, Mitchell joined the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts Regiment at the age of thirty-three. Little is known of his military service, but he apparently lost a foot in the Battle of Honey Hill, South Carolina, in November 1864. He was one of the few African Americans commissioned as an officer at the close of the war. Unfortunately for Mitchell—and for George E. Stephens in the Fifty fourth as well while the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized his promotion the U S War Department did not He was ...

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Christopher Phelps

outspoken Philadelphia civil rights leader, attorney, and city councilman, was born in Yukon, West Virginia, to Alexander Moore, a physician, and Beulah Moore, a teacher whose maiden name is now unknown. A student during the Great Depression, he attended West Virginia State College from 1933 to 1934 and Bluefield State College from 1935 to 1939. He failed the final literature class needed to graduate from Bluefield State, but considered himself its alumnus ever after and took part in its alumni association.

After working in Athens, Georgia, as an insurance salesman, Moore enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1942. He saw combat against the Japanese during World War II in the Pacific. His time in the Marines imbued Moore with discipline, toughness, and command experience, emboldening him to insist on his rights.

In 1946 Moore married Theresa Wyche Lee a Howard University graduate ...

Article

Alice Bernstein

state senator and federal jurist, was the third of four children born to Violet M. Lopez and James S. Watson, who immigrated from Jamaica in the early 1900s. His father was the first naturalized person of West Indian descent admitted to the New York State Bar in 1914, and in 1922 he was appointed special assistant corporation counsel of New York City, in the Special Franchise Tax Division. In 1930 he was one of the first two justices of African descent elected to judicial office, serving as a municipal court judge. Watson's sisters were lawyers: Grace Watson worked with the U.S. Department of Education, and Barbara Mae Watson was ambassador to Malaysia and assistant secretary of state for consular affairs. His brother, Douglas Watson, was the first African American aeronautical engineer.

Watson was born in Harlem where he lived all his life and was known to ...