1-5 of 5 results  for:

  • Law and Criminology x
  • Antiapartheid Activist x
  • Civil Rights x
Clear all

Article

Stephen Clingman

, South African lawyer and antiapartheid figure, was born Abram Fischer in Bloemfontein on 23 April 1908 to a distinguished Afrikaner family. His grandfather, Abraham Fischer, was a negotiator and delegate for the Orange Free State during the Anglo-Boer War, prime minister of the Orange River Colony after the war, and a member of the first Union cabinet of South Africa in 1910. His father, Percy, was judge-president of the Supreme Court of the Orange Free State; his mother, Ada, came from a prominent family of her own. In this context Bram Fischer realigned the anti-imperialism and Afrikaner nationalism he inherited, turning it toward a wider and more inclusive form of South African identity.

In Bloemfontein Fischer attended school at Grey College where he came under the tutelage of Leo Marquard founder of the National Union of South African Students NUSAS After a year at the University of Cape ...

Article

Holly Y. McGee

South African lawyer and anti-apartheid activist, was born 1 January 1942, in the Tamara township near King William’s Town in the Eastern Cape to Wilmot Goso and Dorothy Nobantu Ntebe; her full name is Victoria Nonyanezelo (Goso) Mxenge. The daughter of two educators, Victoria attended local segregated schools in and around King William’s Town, graduating in 1959. Her initial contact with the overt politics of anti-apartheid protest began in 1960, when as a nursing student at Lovedale Hospital in Alice, she attended political rallies and meetings at the local University of Fort Hare—a recognized intellectual home to anti-apartheid stalwarts like Nelson Mandela and Walter Sisulu. After receiving her nursing degree in 1964 Victoria married African National Congress ANC activist and lawyer Griffiths Mlungisi Mxenge and moved to the Umlazi township near Durban where she trained and later worked as a midwife Victoria s marriage to Griffiths ...

Article

Kate Tuttle

Lithuanian-born Joe Slovo moved to South Africa at the age of nine and grew up in a working-class Jewish neighborhood in Johannesburg. In 1942 he joined the Communist Party of South Africa (later renamed the South African Communist Party) and, shortly thereafter, the South African Army, with which he fought in World War II (1939–1945). After the war he studied law at the University of Witwatersrand, where he befriended Nelson Mandela, who was then the university’s only black student. When Mandela and others formed the African National Congress (ANC) Youth League in 1944, Slovo argued for the multiracial cooperation that became an ANC trademark.

Slovo acted as Mandela’s lawyer in his first trial for treason in 1956 a trial in which Slovo was also a defendant In the early 1960s he helped found Umkhonto we Sizwe the ANC s covert military wing and served for a ...

Article

Raymond Suttner

leading South African communist and antiapartheid activist, was treated by the apartheid regime as its key enemy. At the same time he had a heroic image among the oppressed black majority as a white person totally dedicated to liberation.

Slovo, whose birth name was Yossel Mashel, was born into poverty in Obel, a village in Lithuania, the son of Yiddish-speaking parents, who were isolated from the Lithuanian community by their language and by anti-Semitism. His father left Obel when Joe was two years old to find a better environment. Settling in Johannesburg, South Africa, as a fruit hawker, it was six years before the father could send for his family. Joe arrived in 1936 then ten years old According to his daughter Gillian the Slovo family were on the lowest rung of the newly arrived Jewish community but the color of their skin opened a world of opportunity denied ...

Article

Kate Tuttle

Oliver Tambo was eulogized at his funeral by longtime friend and partner Nelson Mandela as the man who had made the African National Congress (ANC) “the strongest political force in the country.” Born into a devout Anglican farming family in Bizana, in the Transkei region of South Africa, he described his childhood as politically sheltered. While a student at the University of Fort Hare, however, Tambo led protests against the administration, resulting in his expulsion in 1942. At Fort Hare Tambo also met Mandela, then a fellow student.

Tambo was teaching science and mathematics at Saint Peter’s University (he had received a bachelor’s degree in science before his expulsion) when he and Mandela helped form the ANC’s Youth League in 1944. The Youth League energized the historically conservative ANC and facilitated the elections of Tambo and Mandela to the ANC’s executive body in 1949 In the 1950s ...