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Elvatrice Parker Belsches

pioneering surgeon, medical researcher, hospital administrator, and community leader, was born in Wilmington, Delaware, the youngest child and only son of Dr. Jeannette Bacon Stubbs and Florence Blanche Williams Stubbs's three children. The elder Stubbs (commonly referred to as J. Bacon Stubbs) was a physician highly respected by Wilmington's blacks and whites. He served on the city's Board of Health, owned vast amounts of real estate, and financed the mortgages for several black-owned buildings. The younger Stubbs had exemplary role models in both parents: Academic excellence and social consciousness permeated every facet of their daily lives. Dr. J. Bacon Stubbs earned a B.A. from Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute (now Virginia State University) in 1891 prior to earning a medical degree from Howard University in 1894 His wife more commonly referred to by her middle name Blanche was an educator with a ...

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Elvatrice Parker Belsches

physician, author, hospital administrator, civic and organizational leader, and humanitarian, was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, the elder son of Jesse E. Turner, a chef, and Jennie Edwards Turner. The Turner family migrated during Turner's youth to New York City, where he continued his education in the city's public schools. Turner received his preliminary college education in the College of the City of New York and then enrolled in the Leonard Medical School of Shaw University at age seventeen (Cobb, p. 160). Shaw University, a historically black institution in Raleigh, North Carolina, was founded in 1865 by Reverend Henry Tupper under the auspices of the American Baptist Home Mission Society in an effort to educate the freedmen after the Civil War Reverend Tupper was acutely aware that in addition to educating the head heart and hands it was critical to train practitioners ...