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Charles Rosenberg

sometimes known as Carrie, public school teacher and principal, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as were her parents, James Le Count, a cabinet maker who around 1860 became an undertaker (and still later a general carpenter), and Sarah Beulah Le Count, who does not appear to have worked outside the home. There is no record that she or her parents had ever been enslaved. She had one older brother James, Jr., younger sister Ada, and younger brother William who died at age three.

Her entire family is listed by name in the 1850 census living in the city's Spruce Ward, carved out of a portion of the older Cedar Ward in 1846 running south of Spruce Street to Cedar Street about midway between the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers Her paternal grandparents Joseph and Mary Le Count both born in Delaware and married in Philadelphia lived next ...

Article

Charles Rosenberg

school teacher and domestic worker, is best known for a poignant and detailed autobiography that provides a window into daily life for the Americans who were stigmatized legally and socially, during the middle of the twentieth century, by their dark complexion.

Sarah Lucille Webb was born in Clio, Alabama, to Elizabeth (Lizzie) Janet Lewis Webb, a schoolteacher, and Willis James Webb, a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church. In her early years she moved with her parents to Troy, Andalusia, Birmingham, Batesville, and Eufala, Alabama. As an itinerant minister ordained by a Methodist church, Reverend Webb was subject to reassignment to a new church at any annual conference, and every one to two years he had to move. The family supplemented his minister's salary by sharecropping cotton and corn and grew field peas, greens, and vegetables for their own use or for sale.

The family ...