1-4 of 4 results  for:

  • Early Childhood Educator x
  • 1861–1865: The Civil War x
  • 1866–1876: Reconstruction x
Clear all

Article

Florencia Guzmán

was born on 17 March 1813 in the city of La Rioja, in present day northwestern Argentina. The son of slaves, he benefited from the “libertad de Vientres” (a freedom of wombs law) sanctioned by the Asamblea Nacional Constituyente (National Constitutional Assembly), which declared free, after 31 January 1813, all children born to enslaved mothers.

Del Sacramento was the son of Melchor Sacramento and Magdalena Guzmán slaves belonging to the church of the city of La Rioja By being born free he was able to receive instruction by the clergy in reading and writing and he remained under the tutelage of the Rioja church until he was 20 years old Afterward he dedicated himself to working as an elementary schoolteacher at the Iglesia Matriz as well as the Convento de San Francisco in the same city Because of his noted abilities as a teacher del Sacramento alongside the Dominican ...

Article

Stephen Preskill

Lucy Ellen Moten was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, near White Sulphur Springs, the daughter of Benjamin Moten, a U.S. Patent Office clerk, and Julia Withers. Taking advantage of their status as free blacks, the Motens moved to the District of Columbia when Lucy was only a child to secure the best possible education for their precocious daughter. Lucy attended Washington's pay schools until 1862, when she was admitted to the district's first public schools for African Americans. After attending the preparatory and normal departments of Howard University, Lucy Moten began teaching in the primary grades of the local public schools and taught there continuously, except for a two-year interruption, from 1870 until 1883. In 1873 Moten moved to Salem, Massachusetts, to attend the State Normal School, from which she graduated in 1875.

In 1883Frederick Douglass recommended that Moten be appointed to ...

Article

Stephen Preskill

educator, was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, near White Sulphur Springs, the daughter of Benjamin Moten, a U.S. Patent Office clerk, and Julia Withers. Taking advantage of their status as free blacks, the Motens moved to the District of Columbia when Lucy was only a child to secure the best possible education for their precocious daughter. Lucy attended Washington's pay schools until 1862, when she was admitted to the district's first public schools for African Americans. After attending the preparatory and normal departments of Howard University, Lucy Moten began teaching in the primary grades of the local public schools and taught there continually, except for a two-year interruption, from 1870 until 1883. In 1873 Moten moved to Salem, Massachusetts, to attend the State Normal School, from which she graduated in 1875.

In 1883Frederick Douglass recommended that Moten be appointed to fill the ...

Article

Charles Rosenberg

school teacher and domestic worker, is best known for a poignant and detailed autobiography that provides a window into daily life for the Americans who were stigmatized legally and socially, during the middle of the twentieth century, by their dark complexion.

Sarah Lucille Webb was born in Clio, Alabama, to Elizabeth (Lizzie) Janet Lewis Webb, a schoolteacher, and Willis James Webb, a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church. In her early years she moved with her parents to Troy, Andalusia, Birmingham, Batesville, and Eufala, Alabama. As an itinerant minister ordained by a Methodist church, Reverend Webb was subject to reassignment to a new church at any annual conference, and every one to two years he had to move. The family supplemented his minister's salary by sharecropping cotton and corn and grew field peas, greens, and vegetables for their own use or for sale.

The family ...