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David Dabydeen

African‐American leader of the abolitionist movement in the United States who toured and lectured in the British Isles. Douglass was born a slave in February 1818 on Holmes Hill Farm on Maryland's eastern shore in the United States. All his life, Douglass was renowned for his oratory skills. He travelled to Great Britain in 1845 because the widespread publicity of his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, meant that his former owner in America would be able to track him down and reclaim his ‘property’. His friends thus encouraged him to go on tour in Britain. He set sail on the Cambria for Liverpool on 16 August 1845 and arrived in Ireland where he lectured to crowds who were spellbound by his rhetoric Douglass was known to have verbal stamina and could speak for up to three hours at a time His ...

Article

Mikal N. Nash

Frederick Douglass the American slave turned statesman was a towering figure in the struggle to gain civil and human rights in the United States of America for African Americans thus becoming a pioneer in the struggle to make the country s practices more congruent with its principles That civil rights was so inextricably tied to the African American quest for freedom justice and equality in a country that was established in the name of freedom but which grappled with recognizing the humanity of Americans of African descent is indeed a paradox Douglass like Nat Turner and John Brown though not nearly as militant was a visionary and a much needed voice of passion moderation and reason in an environment that clung to conservatism on the issues of race class and gender equality His brand of militancy would become manifest in his advocacy of black participation in the American Civil ...

Article

David Dabydeen

African‐Americanabolitionist who lectured in England. Ward was born a slave but managed to escape with his parents to New York State, where he was educated and later taught in black schools. He became an agent of the American Anti‐Slavery Society and the Anti‐Slavery Society of Canada. It was through the latter that he travelled to England on a fundraising mission in 1853. He remained in England for two years, lecturing around the country and finally publishing the story of his life, Autobiography of a Fugitive Negro, in 1855. British anti‐slavery gatherings often featured celebrated American abolitionist figures, such as Ward.

On 16 May 1853 Ward gave a speech alongside the American novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe at Exeter Hall London as part of the annual meeting of the British and Foreign Anti Slavery Society Thousands were packed into the hall and Ward was well received He ...

Article

Pearlie Strother-Adams

The oldest of eight children, Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (1862–1931) was an American journalist and reformer, known for her crusade against the lynching of blacks during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Wells, the daughter of slaves, born Ida Bell Wells in Holly Springs, Mississippi, blossomed in the midst of the politically and socially charged atmosphere of the Reconstruction period. Marred by violence and Klan activity, the Reconstruction provided numerous examples of racism and injustice for the young Wells, fueling her own eventual activism.

Wells lost both parents to a yellow fever epidemic in the late 1870s. At sixteen she was left to work and care for six siblings while she attended school at Rust College. At fourteen, she began teaching, and in 1884 she moved the family to Memphis, Tennessee, where she taught school and attended Fisk University.

In Memphis Wells was involved in an ...