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Charles Rosenberg

plaintiff in the 1928 case, Brown v. Board of Education of Charleston [West Virginia], was born in the Union South district of Kanawha County, West Virginia, the seventh living child and fifth son of Henry and Margaret A. Brown. Henry Brown, a farm laborer like his older brothers Charley and John, died before 1900. In addition to older brothers Fred and Enoch, and sisters Maria and Ruth, Anderson had a younger brother James, and younger sisters Della and Nina. All were born between 1865 and 1887.

Around 1900 he worked as a porter in a grocery store in Charleston, where his brothers held jobs as porters, baggage drivers, and a blacksmith, supporting their widowed mother and sisters. Brown moved in 1907 to Cambridge, Massachusetts, where his sister and brother‐in‐law were living, joined at least part of the time by the widowed Margaret Brown He ...

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Jason Philip Miller

civil rights activist and real estate entrepreneur, was born in Albany, Georgia, to Clennon King, an entrepreneur, grocer, and activist in local civil rights affairs, and Margaret Allegra Washington. He grew up in a relatively affluent and well-known family, attending local schools. His younger brother Preston King, a political philosopher, refused the draft during the Vietnam War and lived for much of the 1960s and 1970s in England for fear of being arrested. Upon graduation from high school, Slater matriculated at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, from which he graduated in 1946 with a Bachelor of Arts in Economics.

Around that same time King married Valencia Benham and the couple had two sons King and his family returned to Albany where King took up the management of his father s store He also began to build up a real estate brokerage business slowly at first ...

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Amber Moulton-Wiseman

educator, was born Carlotta Stewart in Brooklyn, New York, to Thomas McCants Stewart, lawyer, minister, educator, and civil rights activist, and Charlotte Pearl Harris Stewart. In 1883 Stewart-Lai's father accepted a professorship at the College of Liberia and left his family in Brooklyn with no apparent means of support as he assessed liberal and industrial education models for the Liberian school. His absence and neglect led to a divorce from Charlotte, but by 1886 Stewart had resumed his legal practice in New York and he and his children would remain there throughout Stewart-Lai's childhood.

Stewart-Lai attended public school in New York before accompanying her father and stepmother Alice to Honolulu, Hawaii, in 1898 Entering the racially and ethnically diverse Hawaiian community with virtually no existing African American presence the Stewarts were able to live unburdened by many of the racial prejudices they had known in the ...