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André Willis

Clifford L. Alexander Jr. was born in New York, New York. He graduated from Harvard University in 1955 and Yale Law School in 1958. Alexander worked on a number of community development initiatives in Harlem, New York, before being appointed to a series of political positions in Washington, D.C., in the 1960s and 1970s.

Alexander served as a National Security Council foreign affairs officer under President John F. Kennedy in 1963. He was appointed to three high-ranking advisory positions between 1964 and 1967, including deputy special counsel to the president, by President Lyndon B. Johnson. In 1967 Johnson named Alexander chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission (EEOC), a position he filled until Richard Nixon took office in 1969.

After a brief return to private practice in Washington D C Alexander resumed a role in public life as host and producer of ...

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lawyer, businessman, and secretary of the army, was born in New York City, the only child of Clifford Leopold Sr. and Edith McAllister. Alexander's father, a Jamaican native, became an apartment building manager of Harlem's Young Christian Association. His mother was from Yonkers, New York, where she worked for a real estate firm. Later she headed the New York City welfare department. She was the first African American woman to get elected to the Democratic Party's Electoral College. In this position she became a prominent figure in the broader civil rights struggle. Both parents inspired Alexander's later work to end racial discrimination.

Alexander spent his childhood in New York City. He received his early education at the Ethical Cultural School and Fieldston Schools in the Bronx. After graduating from high school, Alexander went to Harvard University. Here he met McGeorge Bundy Harvard s Dean of Arts ...

Article

Juluette Bartlett Pack

president and chief executive officer of Oxen Hill Partners, a nationally known organization specializing in leadership development programs and brand enhancement strategies, was one of five children and the second daughter born to Ural Noble Langston, a construction worker, and Indiana Billingslea, a homemaker, in Canton, Georgia. Both Langston and her older sister, Patricia Ann were born in what was affectionately known as the “the Little House,” a wonderful three bedroom home built in the rear and to the side of the home owned by her paternal grandparents, Noble Langston and Roxie Upshaw. Her grandparents lived in “the Big House,” which was a lovely stucco and brick home that faced the highway that ran through the town of Canton.

When Marian was a year old her parents moved to Stratford Connecticut where they had three more children each one carrying a middle name in honor of ...

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Sharon M. Collins

businessman, was born James Hamilton Lowry in Chicago, Illinois, the younger of two sons of Camille (Caldwell) Lowry, a seamstress and postal worker, and William Abrose Lowry, a postal worker. Jim Lowry's parents had come to Chicago as children from America's rural South during the Great Migration. Grounded by their parents' race-consciousness and southern roots, Lowry and his brother, William Jr., were raised on Chicago's South Side in a comfortable and protected working-class black environment. He thrived in the strange paradox of black ghetto life in the 1940s and 1950s, which was close-knit and economically diverse and where successful black role models were visible and accessible. Lowry went to A.O. Sexton, a neighborhood elementary school, until recruited in 1953 into a high achieving private school known as the Francis W Parker School an overwhelmingly white but relatively egalitarian school on Chicago s affluent North Side ...

Article

Paulette K. Polley-Edmunds

corporate executive, management consultant, attorney, and author, was born in Detroit, Michigan, to Marian Thomas, a social worker from Georgia whose maiden name is unknown, and Albert Thomas, an engineer from South Carolina. The younger of two children, Pamela's older brother, Vincent, became a lawyer and law school associate dean. She grew up with a mother who worked outside the home and a father who supported women developing themselves intellectually and professionally. Albert Thomas maintained the same expectations of performance for both Pamela and her brother. Both parents were strong believers in the principles of obtaining an education and applying oneself. The climate in the Thomas home also held civil rights leaders and lawyers in high esteem, which motivated Pamela and Vincent to dream of becoming lawyers in the tradition of Thurgood Marshall Pamela loved to read and she excelled in her ...