1-2 of 2 results  for:

  • 1877–1928: The Age of Segregation and the Progressive Era x
  • Secretary of State x
  • Government (Federal) x
Clear all

Article

Thomas Adams Upchurch

One of the most polarizing political figures in American history, James Gillespie Blaine, “the Plumed Knight of Maine,” was the most prominent presidential candidate of the late nineteenth century never to be elected. His chameleon-like character kept him at the top of the Republican Party machinery during both Reconstruction and the Gilded Age. He supported the Union during the Civil War and the Radical cause in the late 1860s, took a conciliatory view of the southern question in the early 1870s, and ultimately all but abandoned the African American civil rights agenda in the late 1870s and thereafter. As much as any other Republican, he influenced the course of the party in selling out African Americans after Reconstruction for the joint benefits of sectional reconciliation and national business interests. He did so, however, without necessarily alienating black voters or friends. Frederick Douglass for instance supported him throughout his career ...

Article

Steven J. Niven

U.S. Army general and secretary of state, was born in Harlem in New York City to the Jamaican immigrants Luther Powell, a shipping clerk, and Maud Ariel McKoy a seamstress both of whom worked in New York City s garment district When he was six years old Powell moved with his family to Hunts Point an ethnically diverse neighborhood in the South Bronx Powell s autobiography portrays Hunts Point as a community of stable families and a certain rough hewn racial tolerance but it does not ignore the neighborhood s upsurge in drug and gang related crime particularly after World War II The Powells escaped the crumbling South Bronx tenements in the mid 1950s however a testament to his parents unstinting work ethic and shrewd housekeeping But luck also played a part Luther Powell a regular numbers player placed a twenty five dollar bet on a number ...