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Luckett V. Davis

boxer, was born Henry Jackson Jr. near Columbus, Mississippi, the son of Henry Jackson. His mother, whose name is unknown, was a full‐blooded Iroquois, and his father was of mixed Indian, Irish, and black ancestry. He was the eleventh child in a family of sharecroppers. When he was four years old his family moved to St. Louis, Missouri, where his father and older brothers worked in the food‐processing industry. His mother died a few years later, after which he was reared by his paternal grandmother. Jackson graduated from Toussaint L'Ouverture Grammar School and Vashon High School, working during his school years as a pin boy at a bowling alley and becoming the inter‐alley bowling champion in midtown St. Louis. He gained his first boxing experience by winning a competition among the pin boys.

Lacking funds to attend college, Jackson worked at a series of unskilled jobs At the ...

Article

Adam R. Hornbuckle

was born Henry William Carr in Montgomery, Alabama, the ninth of twelve children. The names of his parents are not recorded, but at some point in Carr’s early life the family moved to Detroit, Michigan, which many sources give as his place of birth. As a student at Detroit’s Northwestern High School, he participated in basketball, football, and track and field. Undefeated in track and field, Carr specialized in the 220-yard dash, which then was contested on a straight track. Although his best legal time for the distance was 20.6 seconds, he recorded a wind-aided time of 20.0 seconds on 8 May 1961. Carr graduated from high school in 1961 with personal best times of 9.4 seconds in the 100-yard dash and 47.8 in the 440-yard dash. His best performance in the long jump measured 23 feet, 4½ inches.

After graduating high school Carr accepted an athletic scholarship to ...

Article

Robert Repino

football player, was born to Mabel and Samuel Cunningham in Santa Barbara, California. Mabel worked as a nurse, and Samuel was a porter on the Southern Pacific Railroad. The Cunninghams lived in a house purchased by their oldest son, Sam Cunningham, who was a running back with the New England Patriots in the 1970s. Randall also had two other older brothers, Anthony and Bruce.

Randall Cunningham was a star quarterback at Santa Barbara High School, leading his team to a league title and to the state finals in his senior year. After graduating in 1981 Cunningham went to the University of Nevada Las Vegas where he became the starter as a sophomore From then on he set school records by throwing for over 2 500 yards in three straight seasons only John Elway and Doug Flutie had accomplished that feat at the college level by then while at ...

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Luke Nichter

Negro National League commissioner, longtime Harlem community activist, and ordained Episcopalian minister was born in Richmond, Virginia, to John Wesley and Harriet Howard Johnson.

Although Johnson was known primarily for his role as the last president of the Negro National League (NNL), he actually had little baseball acumen. In fact his sport of choice was basketball, and as a student-athlete at Columbia University in the early 1920s, he was one of the best basketball players of his day.

After graduating with a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in Anthropology from Columbia College, Johnson studied at Union Theological and General Theological seminaries in Manhattan. Then in 1923 he became an ordained minister in the Episcopal Church, beginning a career of service in Harlem that spanned seven decades. In 1928 he founded St. Martin's Parish in Harlem and by the late 1940s had overseen the congregation s ...

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Jason Philip Miller

professional basketball player, member of the Harlem Globetrotters, and minister, was born George Meadow Lemon III in Wilmington, North Carolina. Neither his parents' names nor their occupations are known. When he was eleven years old, Lemon went to the local movie house and saw a short reel about Abe Saperstein's famous Harlem Globetrotters basketball team and decided that one day he would be a member. Lemon attended public school in Wilmington, where he excelled at basketball and football. In 1952, while still a high school student, he wrote the Globetrotters to request a tryout and was given one, but he failed to make the team.

That same year Lemon matriculated at Florida A M University but he spent only a few weeks there before he was drafted into the U S Army He spent two years in the service and as luck would have it was stationed ...

Article

Pellom McDaniels

professional football player and minister, was born in Chattanooga, Tennessee, to unmarried parents, nineteen-year-old Thelma Dodd, and Charles White, a semiprofessional baseball player. As a child growing up within the close-knit extended family the Dodds provided, White was mostly influenced by his aunts and cousins, but especially by his maternal grandmother. Mildred Dodd was called “Mother” by all, and she was the first to introduce the young White to the Christian faith. At the age of thirteen, White declared his faith in Jesus Christ and began his quest for truth, living his life by the lessons he learned in the Bible. The future “Minister of Defense” would grow physically and mentally in his convictions and in his dedication to his new identity. In 1979 White now seventeen was ordained as a minister at St John s Baptist Church where he testified openly and unapologetically to both ...