1-20 of 49 results  for:

  • Education and Academia x
Clear all

Article

Paul Nugent

Informed writing about Africa and its people dates back to the era of the slave trade However most of these earlier accounts were written by travellers traders missionaries and consular officials whose methods were random by contemporary standards and who often had an axe to grind African Studies as ...

Article

Jeffrey Green

A school in Colwyn Bay, North Wales, c.1893–1912, whose students came from Africa and the diaspora. The Baptist missionary William Hughes developed the concept of a school in Britain where the education of Africans, including carpentry, printing, pharmacy, and tailoring, could be taught by local craftsmen. Five thousand copies of his Dark Africa: And the Way Out were printed in 1892, and distributed at Christian gatherings. Hughes went to Africa in 1893 to recruit, and there were a dozen students (from Angola to Sierra Leone) at the Institute (originally called the Colwyn Bay Institute) in 1895.

Later students included people from America, South Africa, Nigeria, and Zambia. Altogether, 100 students studied at Colwyn Bay (four are buried there), but Hughes was too busy to keep proper accounts. Financial support evaporated in 1912 and Hughes died in 1924.

Article

Jonathan Morley

Africaneducationist, variously called the Father of African education, the Booker T. Washington of Africa, and, in the title of Edwin W. Smith's1929 biography, Aggrey of Africa. Born in Anomabo in the Gold Coast, the son of the chief linguist in the court of King Amona V, Aggrey was an able pupil and in 1898 travelled to America, where he joined Livingstone College in North Carolina. In 1903 he was ordained an elder of the African Methodist Episcopalian Zionist Church.

A compulsive learner, aside from his Master's degree (awarded in 1912), Aggrey also gained through correspondence courses a doctorate of Divinity from Hood Theological College and a doctorate of Osteopathy from the International College of Osteopathy, Illinois, before going to Columbia to undertake a Ph.D.

In 1920 the Phelps Stokes Fund sent Aggrey to Africa the only black member of the Commission to investigate the ...

Article

Philip Herbert

Nigeriancomposer, organist, and ethnomusicologist born in Uyo, Akwa Ibom state, Nigeria, in 1932. In his early education at King's College, Lagos, and as a chorister at Christchurch Cathedral, in that city, he was exposed to European classical music, Mendelssohn being his favourite composer. His musical outlook was eclectic, and he was involved in dance bands such as the Chocolate Dandies and the Akpabot Players (his own band), formed in 1949, as well as being organist at St Saviour's Anglican Church in Lagos.

Akpabot studied the trumpet and organ in London at the Royal College of Music in 1954, with teachers such as John Addison, Osborn Pisgow, and Herbert Howells. Study at the University of Chicago yielded a Master's degree in Musicology, and he also received a Ph.D. from Michigan State University. He was a broadcaster for the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation (1959 ...

Article

Philip Herbert

Composer, contralto, successful vocal coach, accompanist, and teacher. She was the youngest daughter of the famous African‐American actor Ira Aldridge, and born in Upper Norwood, London. Early on she was educated at a convent school in Belgium. At the age of 17 she was awarded a scholarship to study singing at the Royal College of Music. Her teachers included Jenny Lind and George Henschel for singing, along with Frederick Bridge and Frances Edward Gladstone for harmony and counterpoint.

Aldridge's career was successful and varied, as a contralto until an attack of laryngitis damaged her voice, an accompanist, vocal coach, and later a composer. She accompanied her brother Ira Frederick Aldridge on musical tours until his death in 1886. She also accompanied her sister Luranah in concerts at many well‐known London venues at the turn of the 20th century.

Aldridge also played a seminal ...

Article

Philip Herbert

Nigeriancomposer and ethnomusicologist born in Lagos. His early musical education included being a chorister at Christchurch, Lagos, and in 1945 he enrolled in the Baptist Academy in that city. In 1954 he met Fela Sowande at the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation, who gave him organ tuition. He found Sowande's nationalistic compositional style inspirational.

From 1957 onwards Bankole composed and studied music in England under a government scholarship. From the Guildhall School of Music and Drama he gained a graduate teaching diploma for studies in piano, organ, and composition. His brilliance at the organ was rewarded with a scholarship to Clare College, Cambridge, and he gained a Bachelor's degree in music in 1964 a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists in the same year and later a Master s degree Through reading ethnomusicology at the University of California his interest in the use of traditional African instruments and improvised ...

Article

David Dabydeen

1.William Hogarth's analysis of beauty

2.Joseph Spence and Joshua Reynolds

3.William Hogarth's Captain Lord George Graham in His Cabin

4.Slavery

Article

Pathik Pathak

Event observed every October throughout the United Kingdom to celebrate and recognize African and Caribbean contributions to British society. The foremost aims of the Month are to disseminate information on positive black contributions to British society, to heighten the confidence and awareness of black people in their cultural heritage, and to promote knowledge of black history and experiences. As well as a platform for black culture, it is part of an ongoing educational project to redress perceived distortions and omissions of Africa's global contribution to world civilization. The event's chosen symbol is the Sankofa bird, an Akan symbol showing a bird looking backwards while moving forwards, signifying the need to learn from the past.

The event originated in the United States, when Carter G. Woodson established African and Caribbean celebrations in 1926 In Britain Adkyaaba Addai Sebbo is widely acknowledged as the founder of Black History Month The inaugural ...

Article

David Dabydeen

Scholar, lifelong champion of African rights, and Liberia's first accredited diplomat to the Court of St James, London. Edward Blyden was born in August 1832 in Charlotte‐Amalie, the capital of the island of St Thomas in the Danish West Indies. The third child of free parents—his father was a tailor and his mother a teacher—Blyden enjoyed a tranquil early childhood of personal tuition from his mother, combined with attendance at the local primary school. In 1842 the family moved to Porto Bello in Venezuela, where Blyden's linguistic talents first came to prominence. By the age of 12 he was fluent in Spanish, while at later stages in his life he would also master Latin, Hebrew, and Arabic. On returning to St Thomas two years later, Blyden continued his schooling in the mornings while serving out a five‐year apprenticeship as a tailor in the afternoons.

In 1845 the ...

Article

Blackviolinist who performed extensively in Britain. Bridgetower was born in Biała, Poland, the son of John Frederick Bridgetower, who might have come from the Caribbean, and his wife, Marie Ann, a Polish woman who died when their son was young. Bridgetower was said to have been a child prodigy, having made his debut as a soloist in April 1789 in Paris. The environment in which he was brought up was a significant factor in the development of his talent. His father was employed by Prince Nicholas Esterhazy, and John and his son lived at the back of the opera house with the court's musicians. Haydn was also an employee of the Prince, and it is possible that the young Bridgetower studied under him. A few years later, in England, Bridgetower would play the violin in Haydn's symphonies at concerts commissioned by Johann Peter Solomon where ...

Article

Lynne Macedo

The study of the Caribbean as a series of academic disciplines within British universities. The second half of the 20th century has witnessed a dramatic development in Caribbean Studies in Britain, often due to the sustained efforts of individual scholars of Caribbean heritage. Although leading Caribbean intellectuals such as C. L. R. James and Sir Arthur Lewis had settled in Britain during the 1930s, several more decades were to pass before British universities really began to explore the possibility of offering courses that dealt specifically with the Caribbean region in its own right.

Initially, studies of the Caribbean tended to be part of some larger geographical or political grouping such as that offered at Leeds University in the early 1960s. Leeds Postcolonial Studies Centre claims that its School of English was the first university department to establish research and teaching in Commonwealth Literature, including that of the Caribbean. Its 1964 ...

Article

Postgraduate research centre at the University of Birmingham whose staff and students researched and published in the field of cultural studies, which it was instrumental in inaugurating.

1.Inception

2.Inspirations

3.Methodologies

4.Richard Hoggart and the aims and aspirations of the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies

5.Stuart ...

Article

Philip Herbert

Celebrated black British composer of international standing. Coleridge‐Taylor was born in London in August 1875. His father, Dr Daniel Taylor, came from Sierra Leone to England to study, returning home after qualifying as a doctor without seeing his son. His mother, Alice Hare Martin, raised her illegitimate son in Croydon, Surrey. Later she married George Evans, and by the 1890s they had three children.

Coleridge‐Taylor was encouraged to take violin lessons for six years from a local teacher named Joseph Beckwith. He sang in a choir, and participated in concerts organized by Beckwith. It was Colonel Herbert Walters who spotted the boy's gift for music and supported his development. By 1890 he was studying violin with Henry Holmes at the Royal College of Music, as well as having five anthems accepted for publication by Novello at the age of 16.

In 1892 he became ...

Article

Hakim Adi

The body of ideas associated with Marx and later Lenin concerning the need for the revolutionary transformation of existing capitalist society exerted a strong influence on many black people in Britain, especially during the early 20th century. The international communist movement's vocal and persistent opposition to colonialism and racism as well as the movement's struggle for a new socialist world attracted African and Caribbean members and supporters to the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB), particularly from the 1920s to the 1970s. From the late 1920s until the Second World War, the CPGB established links with black students and workers in Britain, and through them with their compatriots in Africa and the Caribbean. During the 1930s these links were maintained through the activities of a variety of organizations connected with the CPGB and the international communist movement, such as the League Against Imperialism and its affiliate the Negro Welfare Association ...

Article

Jane Poyner

Boxer and ex‐slave from Tennessee, United States, who made a number of trips to England to fight. Dobbs was born into slavery in Knoxville, Tennessee, and picked cotton until he was 15. A slight man, standing 5 feet 8½ inches and weighing just 9 stone 9 pounds, he trained as a lightweight and welterweight. During his illustrious career he fought over 1,000 matches, not retiring until he was 60. In 1898 he made his first trip to England, where, in an infamous fight with Dick Burge he was offered a bribe by a bookmaker of £100 a huge sum in those days to lose the fight He agreed to the deal and was provided with laxatives before the match but switched with a friend who bore some resemblance to him and who was willing to take the medication Dobbs won the match On the same trip he knocked out ...

Article

Jane Poyner

While there are cases in earlier periods where we have some evidence about the education of individual black people (such as that of Francis Barber) or members of particular professions (e.g. doctors a more general picture only begins to emerge with the growing black presence from the middle ...

Article

David Dabydeen

African‐CaribbeanBritish teacher, writer, and novelist. Born in Springlands, Berbice, British Guiana (now Guyana). She trained as a teacher in Georgetown and moved to England in 1951. Once in England, she became friends with other Caribbean migrant writers such as E. R. Brathwaite and Andrew Salkey. Her initial experiences in England were education‐related. In 1968 she became deputy head of Beckford primary school, and later its head. She was London's first black headteacher. Her experiences as a teacher are recorded in her 1976 publication Black Teacher. Gilroy joined London University's Institute of Education as well as the Inner London Education Authority's Centre for Multicultural Education. She was involved in educating and aiding immigrant children and children with birth defects. Apart from teaching, she also obtained a doctorate in counselling psychology. She began writing fiction in the 1980s and her first novel, Frangipani House ...

Article

David Killingray

Pan‐Africanist and journalist born in Trinidad who became a schoolteacher. During the First World War he arrived in Britain and studied at London University. In 1918John Eldred Taylor asked him to become the editor of a new newspaper in London, the African Telegraph. Hercules also became general secretary of the Society of Peoples of African Origin and associate secretary of the African Progress Union. In this capacity he spoke at a protest meeting at Hyde Park Corner condemning the race riots in Liverpool, also writing to the Colonial Secretary demanding that black people should be protected from white violence. In particular he fiercely condemned in the African Telegraph the assault by hundreds of white soldiers on black soldiers who were patients at the Belmont Hospital in Liverpool. When it was announced that black soldiers would not participate in the victory celebrations in London in July 1919 ...

Article

Leila Kamali

Historian, editor, and political activist born on 10 December 1921 near Johannesburg, the child of Latvian Jews. Hirson was educated at Hebrew school in Johannesburg, and studied mathematics at the University of Witwatersrand, where he later worked as a physicist. In 1940 he joined the left‐wing Hashomer Hatzair, subsequently becoming a member of various Trotskyist groups. Between 1944 and 1946 he was a political organizer for the Workers' International League.

Hirson participated in setting up black trade unions, in extremely difficult conditions created by the Suppression of Communism Act. He became involved in the Non‐European Unity Movement, and in the late 1950s joined the Congress of Democrats, the white arm of the ANC‐led Congress Alliance.

After the Sharpeville massacre in 1960 Hirson and his colleagues highly critical of the Congress Alliance s leadership and policies organized the National Committee for Liberation which advocated sabotage as a substitute for peaceful ...

Article

Publishers' fair and literary festival organized by three black presses in London, New Beacon Books, Bogle‐L'Ouverture, and Race Today Publications, to promote black literature and politics in the context of anti‐colonial movements in the Third World. The Book Fair ran annually from 1982 to 1991, and again in 1993 and 1995, its venue from 1985 the Camden Centre near King's Cross. In 1985 regional events were started in Manchester and West Yorkshire (Leeds or Bradford), and also in Glasgow in 1993 and 1995. In 2005 a commemorative volume was published by New Beacon Books in association with the George Padmore Institute, containing reproductions of the brochures and programmes for the twelve festivals, as well as a historical synopsis and participants' memoirs.

Founded by John La Rose and Jessica Huntley following the New Cross fire and the Black People's Day of Action in 1981 the Book Fair ...