1-20 of 585 results  for:

  • Ethnic Groups x
  • Africa and Diaspora Studies x
Clear all

Article

Abé  

Ari Nave

The Abé, numbering around 200,000, mostly live in the Agboville region of Côte d’Ivoire. One of some five dozen ethnic groups in the region, the Abé speak a Niger-Congo language. Linguistically and culturally, they belong to the Akan group.

See alsoLanguages, African: An Overview.

Article

Abron  

David P. Johnson

The Abron inhabit the borderlands of Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, and Burkina Faso. They speak a Niger-Congo language and are part of the larger Akan cultural and linguistic group. Their ancestors, the Bono, founded the first known Akan kingdom during the fourteenth century. As of 2003 some 1 181 ...

Article

Acholi  

Ari Nave

The Acholi people live mostly in the Acholi district of Uganda, an 18,000-sq-km (11,000-sq-mi) savanna plateau. While 43 percent of Acholi clans trace descent from Nilo-Saharan-speaking Luo groups that migrated from present-day Sudan during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, others trace descent from the Lango, Karamojong, Mandi, and Bari ethnic groups. Thus the Acholi represent an emergent ethnic identity, forged among a number of distinct groups who have come to share a homeland as well as a language and certain cultural traditions. Recent census figures put the number of Acholi in Uganda at nearly 750,000, with another 45,000 living in Sudan.

Most Acholi live in small hamlets organized into patrilineal clans Several clans make up a chiefdom or kaka mandit The Acholi distinguish between royal lineages most of which claim to be of Luo origin and commoners but they have not historically recognized a centralized political authority Like many ...

Article

Adangbe  

The Adangbe live primarily along Ghana's coast and in the hills of the Accra Plain. They speak a Niger-Congo language closely related to Ga. Approximately 600,000 people identify themselves as Adangbe.

See alsoLanguages, African: An Overview.

Article

Adja  

The Adja primarily inhabit southern Benin and Togo. They speak a Niger-Congo language. The western Adja belong to the Ewe cultural and linguistic group. Approximately 740,000 people identify themselves Adja Ewe. “Adja” is sometimes also used as an umbrella term to include all Ewe- and Fon-speaking peoples.

See ...

Article

Afar  

Approximately 1.5 million people belong to the Afar ethnic group, mostly in the Denakil plain, which includes parts of northern Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Djibouti Apart from the Aussa oasis and the Djibouti coastline the territory of the Afar is among the most arid on the continent The Afar speak Safo an Afro Asiatic language part of the Eastern Cushitic language group The first known written references to the Afar appeared in the 13th century in the work of Arabic geographer Ibn Said He called them the Danakil a name that the Afar now consider offensive but one that is still used widely by neighboring Arab groups The Somali people mostly use the term Adal or Udali The Afar have traditionally lived as pastoral nomads raising sheep goats camels and cattle Some work as salt miners on the Denakil plain where temperatures regularly reach 50° C 120° F ...

Article

Afikpo  

Heidi Glaesel Frontani

The Afikpo are a small subgroup of the Igbo, the largest ethnic group in southeastern Nigeria. The Afikpo account for around 672,000 of the approximately 25 million Igbo in Nigeria and are best known for their mask making, masked performances, and associated secret societies, and their unique legal system.

Archaeological findings suggest that the Afikpo Ehugbo civilization existed in Neolithic times when humans were just transitioning from hunting and gathering to farming The early Afikpo cultivated yams coco yams rice palm oil palm kernels and vegetables and fished the rivers in their forested lands Yams were for a long time central to food security and male Afikpo identity and achievement Afikpo society like Igbo societies in general was highly competitive and individualistic an Afikpo male s status was related to his age group and the number of yams in his barn which reflected the size of his extended family and ...

Article

Ari Nave

In 1652 the Dutch East India Company established a colony on the Cape of Good Hope, intended primarily to provision company ships sailing between Europe and Asia. The colony's first Dutch settlers built Cape Town and farmed in the surrounding countryside. Over the next several decades Germans and Huguenots arrived—many of them fleeing religious persecution in Europe—and intermarried with the Dutch settlers. The descendants of this population forged the Afrikaner ethnic identity, characterized by adherence to Calvinism and the Afrikaans language, which is closely related to Dutch.

From its early years the Cape Colony relied on slaves imported from India, Indonesia, Madagascar, and later, Mozambique. The colonialists imported slaves largely because they considered the local Khoikhoi pastoralists an unsuitable labor force. Attempts of Afrikaner farmers (also known as Boers) to take over land occupied by the Khoikhoi led to two wars (1659–1660 and 1673–1677 The Boers ...

Article

Rasheed Olaniyi

Afro-Cuban denotes images and expression of African identity in Cuban culture. It reinforces the historical, cultural, and ideological link of the Spanish Caribbean with Africa. The cultural ramifications of Afro-Cuba symbolize the trajectory of the Cuban nation. As a cultural expression from a marginal space and victimhood, Afro-Cuban has been transformed into a national icon. Many Cubans claim African ancestry. Some have claimed ethnic affinity with the Yoruba, while others claim to be descendants of the Madinga, Fula, or Makua. Afro-Cuban cultural norms and religious practices survived the cruelty of slavery and colonial regimes to emerge as national culture. Havana and Mantanza plantations had a large concentration of the Yoruba slaves who were transported to Cuba between 1817 and 1860 With their tenacity for cultural integrity religiosity and autonomous spaces they established Regla de Ocha a system of beliefs rites and practices derived from a mixture of Roman Catholicism ...

Article

Afusari  

The Afusari, an ethnic group of Nigeria, are also known as Afusare, Izere, Jari, Jarawa, Feserek, Afizarek, Fezere, Jarawan Dutse and Fizere. The Afusari primarily inhabit the Kadima, Plateau, and Bauchi States of Nigeria. They speak a Niger-Congo language. Approximately 275,000 people consider themselves Afusari.

Article

Agaw  

The Agaw primarily inhabit central and northern Ethiopia and Eritrea. They speak an Afro-Asiatic language in the Cushitic cluster, suggesting that their ancestors lived in the region for thousands of years before the arrival of speakers of Semitic languages, such as the Amhara and Tigre Approximately 200 000 ...

Article

Ahanta  

The Ahanta primarily inhabit the coast of western Ghana. They speak a Niger-Congo language and are considered part of the larger Akan ethnolinguistic group. Some 160,000 people identify themselves as Ahanta.

Article

Kathleen Sheldon

Somali politicomilitary leader who played a central role in the collapse of the state and the large-scale violence against civilians that accompanied it, was born in the Mudug region of Somalia, into the Habr Gidir clan. His name is also spelled Maxamed Faarax Caydiid. Little is known about his early life, other than that he served with the Italian colonial police force and in the 1950s received some training in Italy and in the Soviet Union. He served under Somalian president Mohamed Siyad Barre, rising to the rank of general. He was involved in the Ogaden War of 1977–1978, in which Somalia tried and failed to take over what is now Ethiopia’s Region Five and is largely populated by Somalis.

In the 1980s Aidid began to turn against Siyad Barre and when the president suspected him of plotting against him he imprisoned Aidid for six years As ...

Article

Akan  

David P. Johnson

The broad Akan grouping includes a number of separate ethnic groups. The Akan speak a group of closely related languages belonging to the Kwa branch of the Niger-Congo family. The Akan peoples share several cultural traits, but each has its own history and customs. In modern Ghana, the term Akan also refers to the country's most widely spoken indigenous language—also known as Twi—which is shared by the Asante, the Fante, and several other Ghanaian peoples. However, the “Akan” language of Ghana is but one of several languages in the larger Akan grouping. The main Akan ethnicities include the Akyem, Akwamu, Asante, Brong, Denkyira, Fante, Nzima, Sefwi, and Wassa of Ghana, and the Baule and Anyi of Côte d’Ivoire Linguistic and archaeological evidence suggests that ancestors of the Akan have inhabited a heartland in south central Ghana for at least 2 000 years However migrants from the north ...

Article

Akposo  

The Akposo primarily inhabit central Togo and adjacent eastern Ghana. They speak a Niger-Congo language and are believed to have been among the indigenous population of Togo before Ewe speakers migrated into the area from the east Approximately 184 000 people living in Togo consider themselves Akposo though ...

Article

Akuapem  

The Akuapem inhabit primarily the eastern region of Ghana. They speak a Niger-Congo language and belong to the larger Akan cultural and linguistic group. According to a 2004 population estimate, some 555,000 people consider themselves Akuapem.

Article

The Akunakuna inhabit primarily the Cross River State of Nigeria and western Cameroon. They speak a Bantu language and are related to the Efik and Ibibio, also of Nigeria. Approximately 350,000 people consider themselves Akunakuna.

Article

Akyem  

The Akyem primarily inhabit the eastern region of Ghana. They comprise three major subgroups: the Abuakwa, the Bosume, and the Kotoku. They speak a Niger-Congo language and belong to the Akan cultural and linguistic group. Approximately one million people consider themselves Akyem.

Article

Rosemary Elizabeth Galli

nationalist, journalist and indigenous rights advocate, was born in Magul, Mozambique, on 2 November 1876. His father, Francisco Albasini, married the granddaughter of the head of Maxacuene clan in the Portuguese colony’s capital; her name is not recorded. João dos Santos was also known by his Ronga nickname, Wadzinguele. His grandfather João Albasini, a Portuguese trader, later established himself and a second family in the republic of the Transvaal where he became the vice-consul of Portugal. João dos Santos Albasini received a limited education at the Catholic Mission of Saint José Lhenguene; secondary education was not available in Mozambique. However, he was a keen reader especially of political tracts and gained great facility in writing both Portuguese and Ronga. Sometime around 1897 Albasini married Bertha Carolina Heitor Mwatilo but the marriage was unhappy and they divorced in 1917. They had two children.

As Albasini reached adulthood Portugal defeated ...

Article

Alur  

The Alur primarily inhabit the northern shores of Lake Albert, both in western Uganda and northeastern Congo-Kinshasa. They speak a Nilo-Saharan language and belong to the Western Nilotic cultural and linguistic cluster. Though precise numbers are difficult to come by, more than 500,000 people consider themselves Alur.