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Nicole Sealey

novelist, philosopher, and scholar was born in London, England, to Joe Appiah, a Ghanaian barrister and statesman, and Peggy Cripps, novelist and daughter of Sir Stafford Cripps, a British statesman. Not long after Appiah's birth, his family relocated to Ghana, where he attended primary school. After the political imprisonment of his father by then‐president Kwame Nkrumah, Appiah returned to England. There he completed his secondary education at Bryanston, a British boarding school.

Influenced by his mother's affinity for the literary arts, Appiah read works of authors such as Chinua Achebe, D. H. Lawrence, and Tolstoy. Visitors to the Appiah residence included the Pan‐Africanist authors and theorists C. L. R. James and Richard Wright. Appiah's multiethnic family and early fascination with literature helped shape his identity and his world view. In 1972 he entered Cambridge University where he earned both a BA and ...

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Black Los Angeles: American Dreams and Racial Realities is an anthology edited by Darnell Hunt and Ana-Christina Ramon providing a multifaceted analysis of neighborhoods of metropolitan Los Angeles that are either currently or historically predominantly black. The contributions selected by the editors highlight the rich history of accomplishment and survival in Los Angeles's community of color as it continuously confronts challenges to the geographical space of the community; shifts in local and national policy; the changing dynamics around race, social class, gender, and sexual identity; shifts in the opportunity structure for residents; and the realities of environmental and economic risk. The volume is organized into four parts: Space, People, Image, and Action It begins with a look at the historical foundations of the black community of Los Angeles and ends with a more contemporary question of now what for readers via series of action research chapters ...

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Perhaps no two films give as clear a window into the experiences of working-class black men in Southern California as Killer of Sheep (1978) and Boyz N the Hood (1991). Though shot in very different styles and moments, both communicate working-class despair as it plays out against the Los Angeles landscape.

Charles Burnett, director of Killer of Sheep, was a member of what is now known as the LA Rebellion, a group of black filmmakers trained at UCLA who experimented with new ways to tell stories about black experience. These filmmakers used cinematic techniques drawn from a wide variety of international film movements, including the New Wave cinemas, Italian Neorealism, and avant-garde and experimental film. Killer of Sheep s first scene is unexplained and yet intimate revealing close ups of an unnamed man yelling at his preteen son for not defending his brother This ...

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Charles Rosenberg

who played in the original lineup of the Funk Brothers, often lacking the recognition accorded to star vocalists, was born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Ollie and Maudie Thomas Cosby. His father, who worked as a porter, was born in Missouri, and his mother, who worked as a maid, in Georgia; they married in Detroit on 20 January 1927 at the ages of twenty-four and eighteen. Cosby may have been the couple’s only child.

Little has been documented about Cosby’s early years, but he graduated from Northern High School in Detroit, where he played in the school band. He also served in the U.S. Army in the early 1950s, during the Korean War, playing in a military band with jazz musician Cannonball Adderly, learning to play the tenor saxophone.

After the war Cosby joined the jazz combo featuring pianist Joe Hunter, alongside James Jamerson on bass Benny ...

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Tracy Augustine

It has been said that Los Angeles has no soul. No distinctive culture. No real food or cuisine to define it. It is known as the land of tofu and tacos, gluten-free and agave, juice presses and kale chips. Where “fonuts” are a popular alternative to doughnuts and a thriving cheese shop is dedicated to vegans only. In contrast, black American cuisine is usually defined by its soul food. However, Los Angeles is a city of diverse cultures and palates and a variety of cuisines can be found if sought out: Mexican, Persian, Korean, Cuban, Filipino, Ethiopian, Brazilian, Indian—the list goes on and on and includes diners, dives, full-service restaurants and bakeries. While there is an abundance of restaurants to choose from, there are few black-owned eateries in a city of over 10 million. The 2010 census suggests that almost half of Los Angeles s population is Latino with ...

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Jason Philip Miller

linguist and scholar, was born John Hamilton McWhorter V in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His father was John McWhorter IV, a university administrator. His mother was a college professor, and so McWhorter's world was one of learning and educational attainment. He attended Friends Select School, a small Quaker K-12 school in Philadelphia, and was a precocious student who often felt himself more intelligent than his teachers and who reportedly began teaching himself Hebrew when he was still just a young child.

McWhorter's academic skill led him to be invited to attend the Bard College at Simon's Rock, a preparatory college for especially gifted young people in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He was in the tenth grade when he enrolled, and he graduated with honors and an associate's degree. He then matriculated at Rutgers, from which he graduated in 1985 with a B A in French and Romance Languages He removed ...

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Jack McCarthy

Philadelphia soul music Philly soul is a distinct style of popular music that emerged from the city s African American community in the 1960s and came into international prominence in the 1970s The style is most closely identified with the record label Philadelphia International Records and its three main producer songwriters Kenneth Gamble Leon Huff and Thom Bell Gamble and Huff owned the company and wrote and produced most of its recordings Bell was songwriter and producer for many of its successful artists as well as for artists on other labels working in the Philly soul style From the late 1960s through early 1980s Gamble Huff and Bell produced a long string of hits for artists whose music came to define the style These included the Delfonics Intruders Stylistics O Jays Spinners Harold Melvin the Blue Notes Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles Teddy Pendergrass Jerry Butler Lou Rawls Billy Paul ...

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SaFiya D. Hoskins

musician, singer, and songwriter, was born Darius Rucker in Charleston, South Carolina, one of three sons and three daughters of Carolyn Rucker, a nurse. He was raised by his mother and grandmother; his father belonged to a gospel band named The Rolling Stones and was absent with the exception of Sunday morning visits before church. Rucker lived, at times, in a three bedroom house with his mother, grandmother, two aunts and fourteen children. As a young boy he was exposed to the music of Al Green, Otis Redding, and Gladys Knight played by his mother around the house Rucker was fond of singing the tunes his mother played in addition to other genres of music he heard on the radio and at school he had early aspirations of becoming a singer and would mimic playing a guitar with the household broomstick Upon graduating ...

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Charles Rosenberg

by all available evidence the first American of African descent to earn a Ph.D. in anthropology, was a founding father of that science as it became an organized professional field in America, and a leading pioneer in the development of linguistics, doing field research in Haiti, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and southern Africa. His wide range of professional affiliations included the American Anthropological Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Sociological Association, the International African Institute, and the International Linguistic Association. In 1933, he was one of the first three African Americans admitted to the Society of Sigma Xi (Wright, p. 889).

Born in Huntsville, Texas, he was the son of Walter Watkins, a Baptist minister, and Laura Williams Watkins (Wright), whose Republican politics are reflected in naming their son for the party leader and wealthy Ohio senator, Mark Hanna He was the youngest ...