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Charles Rosenberg

described by William and Charles Mayo, the founders of the Mayo Clinic, as “the most able Negro surgeon in America” was murdered by a mob during the Tulsa, Oklahoma, riots of 1921. Jackson was born in Memphis, Tennessee, the son of Townsend (sometimes given as Talgris) and Sophronia Jackson, and grew up in Guthrie, Oklahoma. His middle name was either Christian or Chester.

Townsend Jackson, a police officer in Memphis, fled the city with his family as a mob targeted their home in 1889. Just in time for the Oklahoma land rush that year, he settled in Guthrie, where he was a justice of the peace, a barber, and a police officer. Townsend Jackson owned the family home. In 1900, Andrew Jackson and his older brother also named Townsend worked as porters while their older sister Minnie taught school The neighborhood where ...

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Anita Nahal

home economist and university professor, was born in Henderson, North Carolina, to James Lee Kittrell, a farmer, and Alice Mills Kittrell, a homemaker and possibly a farmworker. Both were of Cherokee Indian and African American descent. The seventh of nine siblings and the youngest daughter, Kittrell attended school in Vance County, North Carolina, and received her BS degree in 1928 from Hampton Institute (now Hampton University) in Virginia. In 1930 she earned a master's and in 1938 a PhD, both from Cornell University. The first African American woman to receive a doctorate in home economics, Kittrell became an influential educator, nutritionist, and philanthropist, a true renaissance woman who epitomized leadership, wisdom, and progressive qualities in her life.

Kittrell was widely published and received many scholarships and awards during her academic career These included the Rosenwald Scholarship the General Education Board Scholarship the Anna Cora Smith Scholarship and ...

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Diane Epstein

Dr Flemmie Kittrell was the first African American woman to receive high honors in the general field of home economics and science a term which she put into use and which encompasses nutrition child development and related sciences She was the first African American to receive a doctorate from Cornell University she accomplished this in the 1920s when few black women went on to receive advanced degrees She received her PhD with honors and there is a home sciences building on the Cornell campus named for her Her accomplishments were noted not just because of her academic excellence but because she was instrumental in the actual building of the structure Further her ideas added to the development of the new home sciences curriculum Kittrell traveled down paths that even few white women would have considered at the time More than just her scholarship distinguished her she had the daring to ...

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James Smethurst

Ann Lane Petry was born and raised in the predominantly white, middle-class community of Saybrook, Connecticut. The daughter of a pharmacist, she worked in her father's drugstore as a teenager and went on to major in pharmacology at the University of Connecticut. After graduating, she worked at and managed the family drugstore in Old Saybrook. Her pharmacological endeavors notwithstanding, Petry wrote short stories while working, none of which have been published. After marrying George Petry, a mystery writer, in 1939, she moved to New York City and dropped pharmacy altogether, choosing instead to develop her career as a writer.

Her first job in New York was at a Harlem newspaper, the Amsterdam News, where she worked for four years. Petry moved on to The Peoples Voice where she wrote a column on Harlem society in the women s section of the paper Her first published work ...

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Anne M. Heutsche

Ann Lane Petry was the first African American woman to write a best-selling novel, one that eventually sold more than two million copies. The Street, first published in 1946, demonstrates the power of Petry’s vivid characters and realistic portrayal of life in Harlem in the 1940s. Throughout her life, Petry explored the humanity of individuals through her novels, essays, poetry, and children’s stories.

Ann Lane was born in Old Saybrook, Connecticut. The Lane family was one of a handful of African American families in this small New England town. Her father, Peter C. Lane was one of the first registered African American pharmacists in Connecticut and the only one in Old Saybrook Lane came from a long line of pharmacists her grandfather was a chemist and an aunt and uncle both pharmacists helped her father run the family owned pharmacy In spite of several racist threats ...