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Heather Marie Stur

the first African American mayor of Gary, Indiana, and one of the first African American mayors of a major U.S. city. Hatcher was elected for the first time in 1967, the same year that Carl Stokes was elected the first African American mayor of Cleveland. Calling on African Americans to take control of their own destiny outside the parameters of the white establishment, Hatcher became a major figure in black politics in the late 1960s and early 1970s. During Hatcher's tenure as mayor, Gary hosted the National Black Political Convention on 11 March 1972 that resulted in the “Gary Declaration.” This paper outlined a political agenda based on the notion that African Americans must work to change both the political and economic systems in the United States in order to redress centuries of discrimination and oppression.

Richard Gordon Hatcher was born in Michigan City Indiana and earned a bachelor ...

Article

Wayne C. Solomon

was born in Iere Village Princes Town, Trinidad, to Sonny Mohammed and Koolsum Ali Mohammed. His family were the descendants of indentured servants and contract workers, brought from various parts of India in the mid-nineteenth century, to cultivate sugar cane by British planters, after the end of slavery in Trinidad. The East Indians, as they were called by the British, to distinguish them from the indigenous settlers (commonly called Indians), were imported as an alternative labor source in Trinidad and other British colonies following the emancipation of enslaved Africans in 1833. In 1938, the year of Mohammed’s birth, Trinidad witnessed a wave of protests by Indian- and African-descended laborers, the prelude to the island’s eventual independence from British rule in 1962, under its first prime minister, Eric Williams.

Mohammed was born into a Muslim family His grandfather wanted him to become a Muslim scholar Among the ...