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Adam R. Hornbuckle

was born in Laurel, Mississippi, the youngest of ten children born to Peter and Eulalia Boston. His father, who worked as a fireman for the Gulf, Mobile, and Ohio Railroad before losing sight in his right eye, provided for the family by farming, hauling junk, and doing other odd jobs. His mother was a homemaker. As a student at Oak Park High School in Laurel, Boston developed both academic and athletic skills. As quarterback on the football team, he led Oak Park to the African American state high school football championship in 1956. In track and field, Boston excelled in the hurdling, sprinting, and jumping events. As a junior in 1956 he established a national high school record in the 180-yard low hurdles and led Oak Park to the first of two consecutive African American state high school track championships.

After graduating high school in 1957 Boston earned ...

Article

Kate Tuttle

Kipchogo Keino was the first of Kenya’s world-class distance runners to make his mark on the world sports scene. He won gold and silver medals at both the 1968 and 1972 Olympic Games, set long-standing world records in both the 5000- and 3000-meter races, and inspired a generation of Kenyan track and field athletes. Keino, an ethnic Nandi, was born in Kipsamo, Kenya. He was orphaned at the age of two and raised by his grandmother. His first racing success came in 1962, when he set a national record for the mile. In 1964 while working as a physical fitness instructor for a police academy Keino participated in his first Olympic Games where he finished fifth in the 5000 meter race The following year he broke world records in both of his main events the 3000 and 5000 meter races Sports analysts believe Keino s training ...

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Elizabeth A. McAllister

track-and-field athlete, professional football player, and sports agent, was born in Newark, New Jersey, the eldest of three children of Harriet and Earl Nehemiah, the latter a bookbinder (his mother's occupation is not known). A wide receiver on his high school football team, Earl Nehemiah instilled in his sons an interest in athletics. At a young age, Renaldo “Skeets” Nehemiah and his younger brother Dion participated in wrestling, boxing, basketball, and karate. Nehemiah's nickname of “Skeets,” a family reference to his scampering around the house as a child, would accompany him throughout his life. In 1973 his mother died of cancer; as the eldest child, he assisted his father in taking care of the house and his two siblings. He ran hurdles in junior high school and later at Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School from 1973 to 1977. His track coach, Jean Poquette assisted Nehemiah ...

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Adam R. Hornbuckle

one of five children of James Peacock and Rose Ann Chambers. His father, a sharecropper of African and Native American heritage, who also worked as a railroad dining car attendant, moved the family moved to New Jersey for better social and economic opportunities in the late 1910s. After living in Essex, they moved to Union in 1923, where his father worked as a fireman in a chemical factory.

As a student at Union High School, Peacock participated in basketball, football, and track and field. As a halfback on the football team, he scored 23 touchdowns in his senior year. At the 1933 New Jersey State High School Track and Field Championships Peacock won the 100 and 220 yard dashes and the long jump In the latter he established a national high school record of 24 feet 4¼ inches Later that same day at the National High School Track ...

Article

Gregory Travis Bond

athlete, classical scholar, singer, postal worker, and teacher, was born in Hannibal, Missouri, to James Poage, a tanner, and Annie Coleman Poage, a domestic worker. Both parents were Missouri-born, and Annie claimed to have “freedom papers,” issued either before the outbreak of the Civil War or before the 13th Amendment in 1865. Poage’s siblings were Lulu Belle Poage and Nellie Poage, the future mother of attorney Howard Jenkins, Jr. The Poages moved to La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1884, where James was employed as coachman and Anna as cook and domestic servant at the estate of Albert Pettibone, a wealthy lumber mill owner. After the deaths of Lulu Belle in 1887 and James of tuberculosis in 1888 Anna and her two surviving children moved to the Albert Clark Easton and Lucian Frederick Easton estate where Anna was stewardess in charge of domestic ...

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John M. Carroll

football player and coach, was born Frederick Douglass Pollard in Chicago, Illinois, the son of John William Pollard, a barber, and Catherine Amanda Hughes, a seamstress. Pollard grew up in the all-white Rogers Park section of Chicago, where his family was grudgingly accepted. He was nicknamed Fritz by the neighborhood's many German-speaking residents.

Following the example set by his father, who had gained a boxing reputation in the Union army, and by his older brothers and sisters, who were superb high school athletes, Pollard became a standout athlete in football, baseball, and track. During his senior year at Lane Technical High School (1911–1912) he was named to all-Cook County teams in track and football. Despite his small stature (5' 8”, 150 pounds), he used his speed and agility to score touchdowns, establishing himself as one of the Chicago area's best high school football players.

After ...

Article

Richard Sobel

Olympic high jumper, athletic official, and businessman, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, to Curtis Thomas, a bus driver for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), and Ida Kate (Shanks) Thomas. With his brother and sister, he grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and attended Rindge Technical High School. There he was a Boy Scout (Eagle Scout), on the newspaper, and captain of the track and tennis teams. Though initially unable to high-jump six feet, after his coach changed his style from the western roll (facing sideways) to the straddle (facing down), Thomas cleared 6 feet 8¼ inches and was named team captain and chosen for the national All-American High School Track Team, an honorary team of the best high school athletes, before graduating in 1958.

In fall 1958 he entered Boston University on an athletic scholarship He was on the dean s list captained ...