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Steven J. Niven

soccer player, was born Joseph Nicolas Gaetjens in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the third of seven children of Edmond Gaetjens and Toto Gaetjens (maiden name unknown). Gaetjens was descended on his mother's side from Leonie Dejoie, the daughter of a black general in the Haitian revolution. His paternal great grandfather had come to Haiti as a trade representative for the King of Prussia. Joe Gaetjens thus grew up among Haiti's light skinned elite. Some sources give his middle name as Edouard. Little is known about his early life before he emigrated to New York City as a twenty-three-year-old in 1947 There he studied accounting at Columbia University and paid his rent and tuition by washing dishes in a Manhattan restaurant When the restaurant manager discovered that Gaetjens had played soccer for L Étoile Haïtienne in Port au Prince he arranged a trial for him with the Brookhattan team of the ...

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George Lewis

athlete, photographer, and poet, was born Gilbert Heron in Kingstown, Jamaica. Though he was a talented photographer, particularly of sporting events, and a notable poet, publishing a collection entitled I Shall Wish Just for You as late as 1992, Heron's fame derives from neither. He remains best known as a pioneering nonwhite sportsman in the United Kingdom in the 1950s and as father to the eclectic, prolific, and hugely influential jazz musician and wordsmith Gil Scott-Heron.

Heron came to attention as an association football or soccer player for the Detroit Corinthians although he had previously turned out for the Canadian Air Force Detroit Wolverines and Chicago Sting Standing just below five feet ten inches and weighing just under 178 pounds Heron had the speed and agility that gave him the perfect characteristics for football s target man and goal scorer the center forward In the ...

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Steven J. Niven

soccer player, was born Cobi N’gai Jones in Detroit, Michigan, to Dr. Freeman Jones, a research chemist, and Mada Jones (maiden name unknown), a high school teacher. Not long after his birth, Jones and his elder brother moved with their parents to Westlake Village, an affluent community near Los Angeles, California, where Jones would grow up and hone his skills, competing in San Fernando Valley recreational soccer programs from the age of five. His parents, while supportive of Jones's interest in sports and academics, shared the skepticism of many Americans toward soccer, which was perceived as a game for Europeans and Latin Americans. Moreover, even though the black Brazilian Pele symbolized the 1970s National American Soccer League, the league featured no African American stars. Jones's dedication to the sport eventually persuaded his parents to support his choice of soccer.

After lettering in soccer and track at Westlake High from ...

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Soccer  

Soccer is a game in which opposing teams kick, dribble, and pass a ball across a field toward the opponent's netted goal. Each team's goal is defended by a single player called the goalkeeper; only the goalkeeper may touch the ball with the hands.

In 2000Cameroon won the African ...

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Kate Tuttle

In the 1990s George Weah emerged as one of the best soccer players in the world and the unofficial leader of the approximately 350 Africans who play soccer in Europe. After a difficult childhood in Monrovia, where he was born, Weah became a devout Muslim and a talented athlete, then using his African name, Oppong. Weah began his career playing for teams in Monrovia and Yaoundé, Cameroon. A striker, the six-foot-tall Weah was known for his ball control and ferocious shooting.

In 1988 Weah moved to Europe, where he played for AS Monaco (1987–1992), Paris St. Germain (1992–1995), and AC Milan (1995–2000), a team which he led to Italian league championships in 1996 and 1999. In 1995 soccer s international governing body Federation Internationale de Football Association FIFA named Weah the top player of the year the first time the ...