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Jonathan Morley

An imprint of Heinemann International Division publishing African literature, running from 1957 to 2003. In 1957Van Milne at Heinemann received a manuscript of Chinua Achebe'sThings Fall Apart, the seminal English‐language African novel. He commissioned the work, together with its sequel, No Longer At Ease, Cyprian Ekwensi'sBurning Grass, and a history book by Kenneth Kaunda, soon to be the democratic President of Zambia. The four books were published together in 1962, Achebe taking the editorship of the new series. Things Fall Apart would sell 8 million copies, translated into 32 languages.

Independent Africa's three Nobel Laureates for Literature—Wole Soyinka (Nigeria), Naguib Mahfouz (Egypt), and Nadine Gordimer (South Africa)—were included, as were politicians such as Jomo Kenyatta (Kenya) and Nelson Mandela, whose collection of letters, speeches, articles, and trial transcripts, No Easy Walk to Freedom, was published in 1986 several years ...

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Joel Gordon

Egyptian journalist and newspaper magnate in collaboration with his twin brother, Mustafa Amin, was born in Cairo on 21 February 1914. Their father was Amine Youssef Bey, a prominent lawyer and politician, and their mother was a niece of nationalist leader Saʿd Zaghlul. The boys grew up in Zaghlul’s Cairo villa, a political nerve center, eventually known as Bayt al Umma (the “House of the Nation”). In 1919 Zaghlul headed the national delegation that sought British permission to attend the Paris Peace Conference. Their arrest and exile sparked the 1919 “revolution” that inaugurated the constitutional monarchy (1923–1953). In 1922, the Amin twins embarked upon their first journalistic ventures, a series of handwritten magazines.

Ali attended the Royal Awqaf School from 1926 to 1928 but was expelled for participating in demonstrations against one of numerous minority governments He attended several preparatory schools one associated with the ...

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Rami Ginat

Egyptian journalist, novelist, scriptwriter, publisher, and politician, was born in Cairo on 21 February 1914. He said, “When I hold my pen I feel that I hug the most beautiful woman in the world; I have therefore lived a long love-story. I cannot imagine myself live a single day without my pen … When I pass away I ask to lay my pen next to me in my tomb since I may need it when I write a journalistic research story about the resurrection day” (Mustafa, p. 6). Mustafa Amin, or al-Ustadh the teacher as he was often referred to by his colleagues and followers was one of Egypt s most eminent journalists of the twentieth century Many in the Arab world have regarded him as the father of Arab journalism His pen Mustafa Amin kept reminding his readers was mightier than the dictator s sword a reference ...

Article

Bim  

The word bim originally referred to a native of Barbados, often of mixed blood; the journal Bim encouraged writers to overcome the legacies of colonialism by affirming the mixed or hybrid nature of culture in the Caribbean. The journal, founded in 1942 by Frank Collimore and Theorold Branes ...

Article

Kate Tuttle

More than just a periodical, the literary magazine Black Orpheus was a powerful catalyst for artistic awakening throughout West Africa. While the journal Présence Africaine had provided a forum for Francophone Africans since 1947, before Black Orpheus there was almost no acknowledgment of, or market for, literature and the arts in English-speaking West Africa. Founded in 1957 by a German expatriate, Ulli Beier, Black Orpheus introduced and helped launch the careers of many artists and writers, including Wole Soyinka, John Pepper Clark, Gabriel Okara, Dennis Brutus, Ama Ata Aidoo, Alex La Guma, and Kofi Awoonor. In addition, Black Orpheus published in English translation several Francophone African writers, such as Aimé Césaire and Léopold Senghor, and the works of visual artists including Valente Malagatana and Ibraham Salahi.

Beier had studied and taught English literature in London before accepting a teaching position in Nigeria ...

Article

Joy Elizondo

Poet Gabriela Mistral, the 1945 Chilean Nobel Laureate, praised Virginia Brindis de Salas's poetry in a letter, claiming that as far away as Los Angeles, her poems were establishing important pan-American links among black people. Despite Mistral's assessment, as literary critic Carroll Young states, there is but one other indication that her work was available outside of Uruguay: a 1954 German translation of her poem “Tango número tres.” Little is known about her life. She was born in Montevideo, Uruguay, and claimed to have been the niece of Claudio Brindis de Salas, the famous Cuban violinist who had then settled in Buenos Aires. Active in the small but thriving black Uruguayan community, she published a number of poems in Nuestra Raza (the important black Uruguayan journal), before her first book appeared in 1946, Pregón de Marimorena The Call of Mary Morena Her second volume ...

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Christopher Hogarth

Senegalese intellectual, was born on 10 January 1910 in Saint-Louis, Senegal. Best known as the founder (in 1947) of the literary review and later press Présence Africaine (1949), Diop was a key figure in the movement for the emancipation and recognition of Africa and its cultures.

In his childhood Diop was sent to a qurʾanic school to learn Arabic and the tenets of Islam but was also introduced to Christianity by his maternal aunts As an adult he would be baptized as a Christian in France and given the name Jean After qurʾanic school Diop went to primary school in Dagana and then received his high school education at the Lycée Faidherbe in Saint Louis from which he graduated with a baccalaureate in classics Greek and Latin Since Saint Louis was then among the colonized Senegalese towns considered part of France Diop became a French citizen and ...

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David Killingray

Monthly newspaper, costing 1d., founded in 1893 by the Quaker activist Catherine Impey as a successor to an earlier journal, Anti‐Caste. Published in Street, Somerset, it ran until July 1896. The journal was the monthly organ of the Society for the Recognition of the Brotherhood of Man, which had been founded by Impey in the mid‐1880s. Fraternity's masthead showed clasped black and white hands. From an initial subscription of 3,000, by October 1893 it claimed 7,000 readers. The first editor was S. J. Celestine Edwards. The newspaper campaigned to raise public awareness of the number of lynchings of African‐Americans in the United States. Impey was a close friend of Frederick Douglass, and she actively supported Ida B. Wells (1862–1931) in her campaign to raise international condemnation of lynching in the United States during two speaking tours of Britain in 1893 ...

Article

Elsie A. Okobi

Nigerian journalist, newspaper founder, and nationalist politician, was born in Twon-Brass to Obidiah Joshua Ikoli from Ogbia and Rhoda Bogofanyo Egebesi from Twon-Brass, in present-day Bayelsa State. Ernest Sisei Ikoli’s elementary education was at Bonny Government School in Bonny, Rivers State, Nigeria, and his secondary education was at the capital, Lagos, where he was a member of the first group of students admitted to Kings College in 1910. An excellent student, Ikoli’s outstanding performance in his Cambridge Senior Local examination in 1912 led to his appointment as the first African teacher of mathematics and science at Kings College, a position he held from 1913 to 1919. During that period he taught Sylvanus Epiphanio Olympio, who later became the president of the Republic of Togo.

In 1919 Ikoli left his teaching position for journalism It was in this capacity that he was most successful earning the accolade of ...

Article

Michael Niblett

Journal first published in London in July 1938. The successor to Africa and the World and the African Sentinel, it served as the media organ for the International African Service Bureau (IASB). When Wallace‐Johnson, editor of the previous two IASB journals, returned to Sierra Leone, the Trinidadian historian, theorist, and activist C. L. R. James assumed control of the new, monthly publication. Fellow IASB founder member Ras Makonnen was equally influential, securing publishing offices and managing to have printing costs defrayed.

Under James the journal sought to be more radical than previous black writing from London It called on black intellectuals to identify with the struggle of the masses around the world and no longer to rely on the supposed charity of the imperialist powers With its motto Educate Cooperate Emancipate Neutral in nothing affecting the African people the journal was aimed at activists and was ...

Article

Hans P. Hahn

The life of Janheinz Jahn was dedicated to the support and dissemination of African literature in German-speaking countries. He was a pioneer in that pursuit—to impart African literature—with restless engagement and consequence. After studying the history of arts and the Arabic language in the 1930s, he was a soldier during World War II and became a prisoner of war. After his release in 1946, he worked as a freelance writer and journalist. Throughout the rest of his life, he never had an academic position and made his living from publishing books.

In 1950 he met Leopold Senghor when the latter was in Frankfurt am Main at the invitation of the Institut Culturel Français This meeting and the conversations with Senghor left such deep and lasting impressions that a short time later Jahn himself started to give public lectures on African literature At the same time he initiated ...

Article

Haggai Erlich

Egyptian political activist, journalist, and writer, was born on 14 August 1874 into a middle-class family. His father was an army officer. Mustafa Kamil first attended the traditional Qurʾan school and then a modern secondary school, which he completed in 1891. He was then admitted to the Khedival Law School and immediately distinguished himself by establishing a student journal, Al-Madrasa (The School).

Kamil caught the eye of Prince ʾAbbas, who in 1892 became the new Khedive ʿAbbas Hilmi II. Earlier that year, the Khedive supported the sending of Mustafa Kamil to study in France in order to build connections useful to the Khedive’s anti-British strategy. In November 1894 Kamil finished law school in Toulouse, France, and returned to Egypt to establish an Association for the Motherland’s Revival, organizing young nationalists and the Khedive’s men. In May 1895 he returned to France and established contacts with Francois Deloncle a ...

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Bodil Folke Frederiksen

Kenyan journalist and writer was born in Kabete South Kikuyu as Mwaniki Muoria the son of peasants Mwaniki wa Muoria and Wambui wa Mbari He acquired his Christian name Henry at his baptism at the age of 16 He spent his early years herding his family s goats and sheep but when his younger brother was old enough to take over those duties Muoria entered the nearest mission school financing his education with the sale of vegetables cultivated by his mother on the family land After a spell as an apprentice with a plumbers firm which did not satisfy a young man who was eager to learn Muoria entered the British East African Railways Training School and was employed by the Railways first as a signalman later as a guard and deputy stationmaster His job took him all over Kenya but he became increasingly dissatisfied with the miserable living conditions ...

Article

David Killingray

Newspaper established by Sylvia Pankhurst in 1936, following the Italian invasion of Ethiopia. Pankhurst (1882–1960) was a veteran of the campaign in Britain to secure women's right to vote. She was also involved in various working‐class women's organizations; as a socialist pacifist she opposed the First World War, welcomed the Russian Revolution, and condemned Italian Fascism. Pankhurst realized that Mussolini's imperial plans would lead to war with Ethiopia. She helped to found the Abyssinian Association and wrote articles in British newspapers in support of that country's interests. After Italy invaded Ethiopia in 1935, Pankhurst founded her weekly newspaper, the New Times and Ethiopian News, which she edited for exactly twenty years, from 1936 to 1956 In the 1930s the newspaper sold 10 000 copies and was published in Woodford Essex It supported the League of Nations opposed Fascism contained news about Italian ...

Article

J. O. J. Nwachukwu-Agbada

Nigerian writer, publisher, and educator, was born Florence Nwanzuruahu Nkiru Nwapa on 13 January 1931 in Oguta, eastern Nigeria, during British colonial rule. Her parents, Christopher Ijeoma and Martha Nwapa, were teachers who sent their daughter to elementary school at the Church Mission Society (C. M. S.) Central School in Oguta between 1936 and 1943. She then attended Archdeacon Crowther Memorial Girls’ School near Port Harcourt and the C. M. S. Girls’ School. After studying at Queen’s College, Lagos, for two years, she briefly taught at Priscilla Memorial Grammar School, Oguta. She earned her BA in 1957 from University College, Ibadan, and continued her studies in Scotland, earning a postgraduate diploma in education in 1958 from the University of Edinburgh.

After returning to Nigeria in 1959 Nwapa worked as a women s education officer in Calabar She taught geography and English at Queen s School in Enugu and ...

Article

Françoise Balogun

Founded in 1947, Présence Africaine is a long intellectual adventure comprised of a journal, an association, a publishing house, and a bookstore. It is a vast enterprise aiming to defend the cultural values of Africa and its diaspora. Blacks, artists, and intellectuals have spoken and written with the intention of affirming their identity while preserving a dialogue with people of other horizons. The openness and generosity that have presided over the enterprise have allowed African culture, long denied and repressed, to retake its place in the concert of nations.

The Founder. Présence Africaine is the work of Alioune Diop. Born in Sénégal in 1910 and with the promise of a brilliant career he was in turn a teacher and official at the AOF and even a senator he quickly renounced the lure of politics and brought all of his efforts to African culture specifically black culture He took ...

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Kadija Sesay

Black book publishing includes books produced by black‐owned companies and black‐led organizations for black authors, books produced by black‐owned companies for culturally diverse authors, and books produced by companies predominantly by and about black people.

1.Community publishing

2.Women publishers

3.Other black publishers

Black publishing companies in Britain often have a dual purpose; to serve as a focal point in the black community for social gatherings and information centres, as well as publishing material of specific interest to their target audience.

The earliest book publishing company of note were New Beacon Books, established in 1966 by John La Rose and Sarah White. They published the former's poetry collection Foundations: A Book of Poems, under the name Anthony La Rose, in the same year, and started a specialist bookselling operation in 1967, opening a bookshop in north London in 1973 It remains the primary ...

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Mussie Tesfagiorgis

prominent Eritrean intellectual, teacher, and educator, was born in the village of Shimanegus Tahtay in Hamasen. Yeshaq’s father, Qeshi Tewelde Medhin Gebre Medhin, a priest in the Orthodox Tewahdo Church, was also one of the few popular Eritrean intellectuals of his time. Apart from Tigrinya (his mother tongue), Qeshi Tewelde Medhin Gebre Medhin had mastered many other languages and was fluent in Geez Tigre Amharic Hebrew Italian and Swedish He also possessed a rudimentary knowledge of Latin German Greek and English and was one of the few Eritrean intellectuals who translated the Holy Bible into local languages particularly Tigrinya and Tigre As a young child Yeshaq was among the small minority of advantaged Eritreans who were allowed an elementary education under the Italian colonial administration and went to Swedish missionary schools in Geleb near Keren and Asmara After completing his elementary education Yeshaq was among the extremely few privileged ...

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Joel Gordon

Egyptian actress and publisher, was born in Tripoli, Lebanon, on 15 January 1898. She is also known as Rose al-Youssef. Yusuf’s mother died in childbirth and her father relocated to Alexandria, Egypt. Soon after, he traveled to Brazil, leaving Yusuf with friends, and was never heard from again. At age seven Yusuf ran away to Cairo, where she began frequenting the theater district. Aziz Eid, leader of an acting troupe, “adopted” her, teaching her to read and write and giving her minor parts. Her break came when she was fourteen. She filled in as an understudy playing a seventy-year-old grandmother and never looked back. Taking the stage name Rose al-Youssef (she would also be known as the Sarah Bernhardt of the East), she played with other leading companies, including the Ramsis Theater Company directed by Yusuf Wahbi, and became the first lady of the Egyptian stage.

In 1918 ...