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Julia Sun-Joo Lee

slave and minister, was born in Maryland. The names of his parents are unknown. For the first twenty-five years of his life Cooper was known as “Notly.” He escaped to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, around 1800 and took the name John Smith. Employed at a lumberyard, he married a free black woman and had four children. Around this time Cooper's identity was betrayed by a friend. He was separated from his family and sent to Washington, D.C., to be sold at auction. He managed to escape and, with the help of a friend, return to Philadelphia, where he was reunited with his family. Still in danger of recapture, Cooper concealed himself at the home of a Quaker, where he stayed for a week while his master attempted to locate him.

Cooper fled to New Jersey where he was hired by a farmer His whereabouts were again discovered and Cooper escaped by ...

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Charles Rosenberg

newspaper heiress, editor, and socialite, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the oldest child of publisher Christopher J. Perry and Cora Perry. Her father was born of free parents in Baltimore in 1854 and went to Philadelphia at an early age to get an education denied to children of his color in his native city. In 1884 he established the Philadelphia Tribune, which in time became the oldest continually published newspaper written and edited by, and for, Americans of African descent.

Bertha Perry grew up in the Lombard Street Presbyterian Church, where her parents were members. At the age of twenty-nine she continued to live with her parents and two of her three younger sisters, Beatrice Perry and Ethel Jackson, who all worked as clerks at the newspaper. When their father died in May 1921 Bertha Perry became managing editor and women s editor her sister Beatrice ...

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James M. Salem

entrepreneur and record label owner, was born Don Deadric Robey in Houston, Texas, the son of Zeb Robey and Gertrude (maiden name unknown). Little is known of his childhood. Don dropped out of high school in the eleventh grade, reportedly to become a professional gambler in Houston nightspots frequented by African Americans; later he was suspected of being involved in the city's numbers operation. He also entered the taxi business prior to World War II and established a business in entertainment promotion, bringing name bands and celebrity attractions into segregated sections of the Houston area.

Though Robey opened his first nightclub in 1937, it was the postwar Bronze Peacock Dinner Club, opened in 1946, that he parlayed into an interconnected set of entertainment and music businesses that made him, according to the Houston Informer one of the city s foremost black business wizards Robey s skill ...