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Noliwe Rooks

entrepreneur and philanthropist, was born Annie Minerva Turnbo on a farm in Metropolis, Illinois, the tenth of eleven children of Robert Turnbo and Isabella Cook, both farmers. Robert and Isabella owned the land they farmed and were able to provide comfortably for themselves and their children. After her parents died of yellow fever in 1877, Turnbo went to live with an older sister in Peoria, Illinois.

As a young woman Turnbo grew dissatisfied with the hair grooming methods then in use by African American women which often involved the use of goose fat soap and harsh chemicals for straightening purposes Stronger products to straighten naturally curly hair generally damaged the hair follicles or scalp One of the methods recommended by such products advised users to wash their hair and lay it out flat while using a hot flatiron to apply the solutions Even washed and laid out ...

Article

Mary K. Dains

Malone, Annie Turnbo (09 August 1869–10 May 1957), African-American businesswoman, manufacturer, and philanthropist was born in Metropolis Illinois the daughter of Robert Turnbo and Isabella Cook farmers Little is known of the early childhood of Annie Turnbo Malone except that she was second youngest of eleven children Her parents were former slaves in Kentucky Her father joined the Union army during the Civil War and her mother escaped to Illinois with her small children After the war Robert Turnbo joined his family at Metropolis where he became a farmer and landowner Following the death of both parents Annie went to live with older brothers and sisters in Metropolis and later Peoria and Lovejoy Illinois She completed public school education in Metropolis and attended high school in Peoria Because of ill health she did not complete her high school education In these early years Malone dreamed of making ...

Article

Tiffany M. Gill

The dawn of the twentieth century witnessed the materialization of the black beauty culture industry and the emergence of the black female beauty industry mogul. Annie Turnbo Malone, while not as well known as her contemporary, Madam C. J. Walker, pioneered many of the methods and goals of this global enterprise and transformed the role of African American women in business.

Annie Turnbo Malone was a child of the Reconstruction Era. Her father, Robert Turnbo, fought for the Union in the Civil War while her mother, Isabella Cook Turnbo fled their native Kentucky with their two children Eventually the family reunited in Metropolis Illinois and the couple had nine more children Annie was second youngest Robert and Isabella Turnbo died while Annie was young and her elder sisters raised her After moving to Peoria Illinois Annie attended high school where she acquired a fondness for chemistry which combined ...

Article

Theresa Leininger-Miller

entrepreneur, hair-care industry pioneer, political activist, and philanthropist. Many newspapers called Walker, born Sarah Breedlove, the first female African American self-made millionaire. The daughter of the former slaves Owen Breedlove and Minerva Breedlove, Walker was the first member of her family born free on the Burney family cotton plantation in Delta, Louisiana. She and her five siblings were raised in poverty on farms there and in Mississippi. Walker was orphaned by age seven, and she had little more than three months of formal education. She lived with her older sister Louvenia and her sister's cruel husband in Vicksburg, Mississippi, until 1882, when she married Moses McWilliams at the age of fourteen. Their only child Lelia (who renamed herself A'Lelia in 1922 for unknown reasons) was born in 1885. After Moses McWilliams died in about 1888 Walker moved with her daughter to Saint ...

Article

John N. Ingham

Walker, Madam C. J. (23 December 1867–25 May 1919), businesswoman, was born Sarah Breedlove in Delta, Louisiana, the daughter of Minerva (maiden name unknown) and Owen Breedlove, sharecroppers. Her destitute parents struggled mightily against the system of racism and oppression in the post–Civil War years but were defeated by it and died, leaving Sarah an orphan at six years of age. She lived next with her sister, Louvenia, in Vicksburg, Mississippi, but life was not much better there. In 1881, at the age of fourteen, she married Moses “Jeff” McWilliams, having one daughter, Lelia (later to call herself A’Lelia). In 1887 McWilliams was killed, possibly lynched during a race riot. Sarah Breedlove, twenty years old, barely literate, unskilled, and with a two-year-old child, faced a desperate situation. Leaving Mississippi, she headed up the Mississippi River to St. Louis where she became a washerwoman.

Every day hour after hour ...

Article

A'Lelia Perry Bundles

“I got myself a start by giving myself a start,” Madam C. J. Walker often said of her unlikely personal transformation from an uneducated washerwoman into a hair care industry pioneer during the first two decades of the twentieth century.

Born Sarah Breedlove on a Delta, Louisiana, cotton plantation near the banks of the Mississippi River, she was the fifth of Owen and Minerva Anderson Breedlove’s six surviving children and the first freeborn Breedlove sibling. Her parents had been slaves on Robert W. Burney’s Madison Parish farm, which had been commandeered by General Ulysses S. Grant as a Civil War battle staging area during the 1863 Siege of Vicksburg. Both parents died before Sarah’s eighth birthday.

Left orphans, Sarah and her younger brother Solomon moved with her married elder sister Louvenia Breedlove Powell across the river to Vicksburg around 1878 after a succession of failed cotton ...

Article

Tiffany Ruby Patterson

Born on a Louisiana cotton plantation shortly after the end of slavery, Sarah Breedlove was orphaned at the age of seven. At ten she became a domestic worker, and at fourteen, living in Vicksburg, Mississippi, she married Moses McWilliams. He died in 1887, leaving her with a two-year-old daughter, Lelia (latter known as A'Lelia). Moving to St. Louis, she eked out a living as a washerwoman. Using available products, she also developed hair-care treatments for black women, including remedies for baldness and other scalp conditions brought on by poor diet, stress, and damaging hair treatments.

Recognizing a lucrative market, she developed her own line of products for a growing clientele. She moved to Denver in 1905 and in 1906 married Charles Joseph Walker a journalist who became her business partner and promoter They marketed their products and the Walker System through door to door sales and ...

Article

Sarah Walker was born in Delta, Louisiana, to indigent former slaves Owen and Minerva Breedlove. She grew up in poverty on the Burney plantation in Delta, working in the cotton fields from sunrise to sunset. Uneducated in her youth, she learned as an adult to read and write. At fourteen, she married Moses McWilliams who was reportedly killed by a white lynch mob two years after their daughter A'Lelia's birth in 1885.

Walker worked as a domestic until she took several risks as an entrepreneur in black woman s hair care products To meet the needs of women who did not have running water supplies or equipment Walker created a hot comb with specially spaced teeth to soften or straighten black hair as well as her Wonderful Hair Grower for women who had experienced hair loss through improper care Business differences ended her marriage to C J ...

Article

Kahlil Gross

entrepreneur, was born in Berkley, Virginia, to Joshua Phillips and Ellen Douglass. At a time when Jim Crow was being established throughout the South and education for African Americans in the public school systems was made separate and clearly unequal, stemming from the Supreme Court's ruling on Plessey v. Ferguson in 1896, Mr. and Mrs. Phillips made sure that their daughter received the best education afforded to her. Sarah attended public schools in Berkley, and then went on to attend Lincoln Preparatory School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Norfolk Mission College for Negroes in Norfolk, Virginia. At some point, she went on to do advance work in chemistry at Columbia University.

Around the age of sixteen, Sarah became a dressmaker. Her parents encouraged her to become a school teacher, however, in 1913 at age twenty four Sarah decided to pursue an entrepreneurial path opening a small hair dressing ...